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Questions & Hopefully Answers about the Episodes a


Tracey
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The first question is about the following dialogue in ST:VI.

Spock : Then we will visually inspect each torpedo.

Scotty : That could take hours!

Does this line of dialogue mean anything? In the Enterprise series, we see torpedoes are stored in "racks". In ST:II we see torpedoes are lowered down some crane into torpedo tubes. Could it mean that torpedoes are stored in some sort of special storage area to prevent accidental detonation, meaning each torpedo has to be brought out individually one by one and then put back in? Or does it mean that the Enterprise-Nil had way more torpedoes than Enterprise-D, on the order of a thousand or so torpedoes?

At the very least, it shows that they do not store torpedoes in racks like in Enterprise by the Enterprise-Nil time period, or Valaris or Scotty or whoever could just get 100 crewmen and finish the visual inspection in 15 minutes.

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No, they couldn't have anyone do it except themselves :) Because they were afraid of sabotage, putting a 100 people on the job would mean that the saboteur might be involved and mess up the results.

So they had to do it themselves. But if I remember correctly, there's a scene where Spock, Scotty, and Valeris are in what looks like a torpedo storage area, and they've just completed a run through.

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::Scratches head::

Hmmm, I don't recall that part. Looks like it's time to drag out the DVD again ...

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It's the part where Scotty says something like "I bet that Klingon _____ never shed a tear," and Spock goes "Hardly conclusive Mr. Scott as Klingons have no tear ducts."

Then Valeris, a few minutes later says something about "A lie?" and Spock goes "An omission!"

That's all I remember about the scene :)

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Your memory does you credit, sir. It's more than I could remember. But then again, I can hardly remember my name.

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Because they were afraid of sabotage, putting a 100 people on the job would mean that the saboteur might be involved and mess up the results.

Makes sense. Thanks.

O.K. Next question.

In Nemesis...what happened to the Prime Directive? When they detected B-4, they found out that he was on a pre-warp industrial world. Now, it's their ultimate imperative that they do not influence or interfere in the course of any pre-warp societies history or interfere in the politics of other nations. Did Picard forget this? I find it hard to believe, considering he was expounding it all through TNG. So what was the deal in Nemesis? First, the parked his highly visible starship in a medium orbit and hoped that no one on the surface noticed. Geordi claimed there was an ion storm nearby that could head their way, and prevent them from transporting. But that doesn't mean it's there yet! Why didn't they beam the positron sources up to the Enterprise before the ion storm reached their position and take off? That way, they didn't have to go to the surface at all, which minimizes the chance that they'd be noticed.

Defying explaination, Jean Luc "Mr. Prime Directive" Picard decided to fly down in his new toy, the Argo, a shuttle/dunebuggy combo. I can see the appeal, though the dunebuggy looked like it wasn't meant for offroad (it had leaf springs... you'd think they'd want coil springs for off-road). Of course, they failed to notice that the positron emissions were coming from an half and hour or so drive by outside a settlement. Naturally, the primitives noticed and were understandably upset that an alien craft violated their airspace and aliens were driving around their territory, thus rolled out with tanks and their own dunebuggies to apprehend the ETs (Picard and gang). I'm sure our military would do the same, really.

So what did Picard do? Have the Enterprise beam them and the dunebuggy out and then fly the Argo back by remote, thus minimizing contact? Of course not! They started shooting at them! Wow, using your rayguns on locals who have every right to be angry at you is a great way avoid influencing the history of primitives... not. Now, not only do the locals have to deal with the society shaking fact that they aren't alone in the universe, but that the aliens with the advanced technology are hostile. Oh, that's not going to effect their history at all!

Shouldn't Picard be punnished for this?

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The only thing I can think is that they did some kind of scanning before beaming down and saw the coast was clear. When it wasn't, there really wasn't much they could do except fight back and get out of there. But I agree, it was a dumb move -- really just so everyone could ooh and ahh at the Argo technology ;)

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Add also the technology in B4 that could be potentially dangerous and have an adverse affect if found by the natives.

Look at "Friendship One" (Voyager Season 7) to see what advanced technology can do if it falls into the hands of a species who aren't ready for it...

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OK

Now for the next question...

The first pilot for Star Trek was made in 1963 and Jeffrey Hunter played Captain Pike. The first officer was Majel Barrett who played number 1 and Spock smiled and had other emotional outbursts. The show was never picked up by the networks and so was never made again for another three years.

In 1966, a new pilot is made. This one has William Shatner as Kirk, Gary Mitchell as first officer and the now emotionless Spock as second officer. What if this version was never made? What if the first version made it to the air? How do you think this would affect the Star Trek universe as we know it today?

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Ok, well this is my idea,

The Romulans would act like Vulcans but still of gone to war with the federation. And also destroyed the posts as seen in TOS: Balance of terror. Now you have to choices here. Either Majel Barret would either of stay on. Or he could of been killed changing it back to what we now know. But it is likely that the genesis device would not have been made, and Kirk would have stay as captain. Now because of the genesis device not being made, then Kahn would never of made it off the plant city alpha 5 I believe now either he would of been left or some how found another way off. Now still basing it on what I said Spock could of then got a ship, that was doing a scan of city alpha 5, thinking it was 6 just as the mistake was made by Reliant. Now lets say that spock took command of Reliant, and picks up Kahn Reliant is captured and he takes over Reliant is then destroyed by enterprise. Then on their way home they are attack and are flung into the alternate universe, and because the Vulcans have emotions and lets say that Romulans where a little more peace full they make piece with the cardasins (sp) . Then the terrain empire attacks them and destroys them taking cloaking Technology. When the enterprise arrives in the alternate universe they are hit and there warp drive destroyed and they work out the only way to get back is to have one spring off another live of movies. And later not confusing Nogs father in Emperors new cloak DS9 season 7.

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Now that Voyager is Back on Earth, what became of the former Maquis members who joined the crew?

Personally, I would execute them. Then I would execute Seven of Nine for being a Borg agent. After that, I would execute Janeway by shooting her through a torpedo tube into the sun. Then I would blow up Voyager by using it for target practice.

But thats just me :devil:

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Let's be happy you're not in JAG.. :P

I would imagine the Maquis crewmembers, due to their service, were field-promoted to positions in Starfleet. Or they could have retired after their long ordeal..who knows. I would imagine there is a series of books just like every other series that continues the story.

As for Janeway..we know what happened to her. Got promoted to Admiral and ordered the Enterprise to Romulus in Nemesis. Couldn't tell from the screen how HIGH of an Admiral she was though. I think I saw two pips, which would make her a Rear Admiral. Three, possibly, which would make her Vice Admiral.

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I agree with Tyrwaltas, on everything. But why tracey do you give janeway and her crew and her ship such a hard time?

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But why tracey do you give janeway and her crew and her ship such a hard time?

Hmmm...where should I begin.

Ah yes. How about with the very first episode where Janeway blatently defies the Prime Directive by destroying the caretaker, thus altering the natural evolution of the Delta Quadrant. The Kazon cannot therefore use the array to defeat Kes's people. This unilateral decision also leads to Voyager, as well as the Maquis crew, being stranded in the Delta Quadrant. In and of itself, I would think that perhaps this Janeway character would not be the atypical Starfleet Officer. But lo and behold, throughout the series she boasts about Starfleet's Directives, but defies them whenever she wishes (i.e. Species 8472). But when given opportunities to get home, or make their trip shorter, or anything else that would make the Voyager crew more comfortable, she would deny this while quoting Starfleet Directives, whether it would be the Prime Directive or the Temporal Prime Directive as was noted all the way through this series to the final episode.

Add a singing doctor and an ugly ship design and a former Borg drone that acts like a Vulcan...

Hope you get my point. :)

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Ah yes. How about with the very first episode where Janeway blatently defies the Prime Directive by destroying the caretaker, thus altering the natural evolution of the Delta Quadrant.

I think one could argue, however, that the caretaker was actually disrupting the natural evolution of the Delta Quadrant, because of what it was doing. This, Janeway might have been setting things right :)

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But lo and behold, throughout the series she boasts about Starfleet's Directives, but defies them whenever she wishes (i.e. Species 8472). But when given opportunities to get home, or make their trip shorter, or anything else that would make the Voyager crew more comfortable, she would deny this while quoting Starfleet Directives, whether it would be the Prime Directive or the Temporal Prime Directive as was noted all the way through this series to the final episode.

Hope you get my point.  :)

Yes she boasts and keeps to the rules. Now as shown in equinox when she has the conversation with captain ransom, she speaks about bending the rules but never breaking them. So i think she believed that she wasn't breaking the prime directive. Then in endgame it the man who speaks at the begining speaks of curruption charges, then fair enough it does go on but this could of been brough up agasint Janeway. Now even because the time line was changed she was still an admiral and had the charges if any brough up agasint her. Then lets say what good she did, she destory most of the borg collective saving the federation from the borg. So also brought back new technoly like ablative armor generators, transfasic torpedos, new cloaking device, and a slipstream drive. I mean come on how many advances where made. And she didn't lose to much of her crew. So leave her alone, or we could just start a vote to settle it?

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Then lets say what good she did, she destory most of the borg collective saving the federation from the borg. So also brought back new technoly like ablative armor generators, transfasic torpedos, new cloaking device, and a slipstream drive. I mean come on how many advances where made. And she didn't lose to much of her crew. So leave her alone, or we could just start a vote to settle it?

I guess rules are not rules when the ends justify the means. I've never been a big fan of the Prime Directive. I consider it a cop out for the Feds for many reasons that I'm not going to list here. It deserves its own thread. However, I was let down by the show and Janeway because I thought that after the first episode I watched that I was going to see a different kind of Captain, an almost Kirk-like Captain. I was let down quickly thereafter due to her wishy-washyness.

For this I blame the writers of the show. There was little or no character development, except for the holographic Doctor and Seven of Nine, and the show became a showcase for only special effects.

I realize that alot of the people in this group grew up on the shows that came after TOS and maybe some of you only began watching Trek during Voyager's run, so I could understand how you look at Trek from this perspective.

Not to be a salesman or anything, but watch TOS episodes like the Cage or the Menagerie, or City on the Edge of Forever, or the TNG episode where Picard is transfered to that planet where he has to learn to talk to that alien Captain, or the one where that probe forces Picard to live a lifetime on that planet. These were tremendous character building episodes. Who cares about the technology or the anomolies or time travel nonsense. That should only be tools to aid in the development of these types of storylines.

Voyager could have and should have had all these things, but the writers of this show forgot what Trek was all about.

Recent manifestations of Star Trek have turned me off. Enterprise and its inconsistencies with the rest of Trek and Voyager with the anomaly of the week, that's not for me

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I hear, and i can relate there was more devoplment. But you can't just blame the wirters. Look at the enterprise in say TNG, then look at a galaxy in DS9 it just looks better. And i think that they hoped that better looking things would draw more viewers. Look at the ratings of TNG, then when Best of both worlds comes in it goes through the roof. The people of voyager believed that if they had the borg it would have the same effect but there was no development. Well looking back TNG was the one i liked and i just couldn't relate to TOS. I think voyager was one of the greatess and ds9 after buying the box set it is well very good. And now enterprise is kicking off. I think that TNG and Tos where good for the plots and chartcher delevopment. Where DS9, ENT, and VOY needed chartcher development...::PAUSES.:: Wait that is what you just said. OK i'll stop going but i think if i was given 90million £/$ to make a new star trek i would set it around TNG with a crew that has something oringal. And a good story, with believable lives of the crew. I think that ent should go on and do 7 seasons. Then parmount should ask the fans what they what. It would work. Well i guess i am going to miss a good plot and good space battles. All well always have the box sets.

::Runs to the t.v and turns it on.::

Still after watching 246 times i think it just get predictable.

But as to Q said, ALL good things Must come to an end. or something like that.

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Fist of all, I found DS9 to be very good. It had character development. Both the enemies as well as the regular characters were developed well, around tremendous special effects. The DS9 writers and producers did a good job intertwining character development with awsome special effects. The difference between DS9 and Voyager/Enterprise, is that they stayed true to the Trek ways (i.e. character development and continuity). I liked DS9 because I liked the characters within. I could relate to them because they were more 3 dimensional than the yes sir no sir characters I have seen on both Voyager as well as Enterprise.

OK Next question...

Due to Kahn Noonian Singh, humanity and the UFP has passed laws forbidding the use of genetic engineering to "improve the species" or some such.

Yet genetically modified children bred at Darwin Station has telepathy, telekenisis, and an immune system which can broadcast antibodies.

How was this allowed?

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I think it was done with out the knowaleadge of starfleet, i think. But remember they had that probelm which almost killed the doctor that replaced Doctor Crusher.

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I think that it was done with Starfleet's knowledge. Otherwise why would Starfleet have visited Darwin station in the first place? I am also curious as to what the purpose of creating such humans would be? Wouldn't creating humans who are far more advanced than normal humans lead to the ultimate end of regular humans? Not just only in this case but in any case?

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