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  1. The command department is a very important department to the ship, but most people don’t start there. Captains and first officers all start somewhere. Everyone was an ensign once. With time and experience officers climb up the ranks and may one day find themselves sitting in the center chair. You can never know which department your commanding officer worked in before they were in command. Perhaps they were an engineer, or maybe a medical officer. Maybe they bounced between multiple duty posts before going into a command role. There are several skills that someone commanding a starship requires. Of course, good leadership skills are required. A commanding officer will have to take care of overseeing the ship’s mission as well as delegate tasks to different departments and officers. Each department head acts a specialist in their field while the command division oversees everything and keeps the ship running smoothly. It also helps to have at least a basic familiarity with the different departments under your command so that you can delegate work effectively to the right specialized group of officers. There are captains who have come from every Starfleet background imaginable. Captain Picard was originally the flight controller aboard his first command, the Stargazer. Before serving on the Enterprise Captain Kirk worked on a phaser crew. Captain Janeway was a science officer during her early Starfleet career. This week’s poll asks for your opinion on which duty post you think would best prepare a person for a command role. Is there a specific duty post that provides unique experience that would be useful to a member of the command department? Maybe experience with multiple departments is better and makes for a more well-rounded skill set? Do you think that no department holds the advantage? Let us know which duty post you think best prepares officers for command below!
  2. This fleet has an incredibly diverse array of teams, collectives and activities. Most of these are not directly tied to simming, but allow our member’s creative inclinations to flourish, while enriching this wonderful group. The Wiki Team, Image Collective and Podcast Team are just a few of our more popular facets. Another, from the mind of Captain Roshanara Rahman, is the Federation News Service, or FNS. On our spinoff site, https://fednewsservice.com/, a team of writers help to bring the rest of the Federation to life through news stories that don’t necessarily include Starfleet matters. The team is attempting a resurgence, as a variety of new articles have been published in recent months, and more are on the way, but we need your help! With that in mind, this week’s poll asks you what you’d like to see in the FNS. Are you interested in current events across the quadrant? Are editorials and opinions on matters affecting the galaxy more your style? Perhaps you prefer in depth cultural analysis, or reports on the actions and stances of other galactic civilizations. Perhaps you’d like to see a completely different side to our reporting. Give us your vote, and explain away in the comments section below!
  3. Embracing others, despite cultural differences, is a key aspect of Star Trek’s message and enduring legacy. Though Gene Roddenberry was loathe to include any sort of strife, negativity or conflict in his scripts, there have nonetheless been some superior character relationships that blossom from early dislike. In the Original Series, Spock and McCoy quickly despised one another’s perspectives and mentality, but over time, despite (or because of) the many arguments between them, mutual admiration and respect starts to underpin their association. Julian Bashir and Miles O’Brien are good examples of this phenomenon as well. The grizzled, business-like chief found Bashir’s outgoing and excitable nature almost intolerable, but sharing in danger and serving together for a period of time sees them grow into acquaintances, than friends, then inseparable brothers. Star Trek is filled with these changes over time- with that in mind, which friendship started through adversity did you find most enjoyable and compelling? Give us your thoughts and explain away in the comments section below!
  4. There’s something quintessentially beautiful about Federation starships. Their curves, symmetricality and proud bearing provide a sense of awe. With the exception of a few, special cases (looks furtively at the Yeager class) most of these vessels carry on a long lineage of amazing designs. With that said, Starfleet isn’t the only organization that knows how to sculpt a shapely ship. The Klingons, and their bold, imperious designs have struck fear into the hearts of enemies for centuries. Romulan warbirds dwarf their competition with sweeping wings and imposing, almost beak-like hulls. Even the Borg offer something to the obsessively compulsive- who doesn’t enjoy perfectly geometric shapes? This week’s poll asks you which galactic civilization has the most pleasing ship aesthetic. Do you enjoy the horseshoe shaped crafts of the Ferengi? Or do the jagged, asymmetrical combat barges of the Breen catch your eye? Give us your vote, and let us know in the comments section below!
  5. The United Federation of Planets is a union made up of hundreds of member worlds. Starting as an alliance between Humans, Vulcans, Andorians, and Tellarites, the Federation grew outward as more and more worlds joined. Planet by planet and sector by sector the United Federation of Planets expanded its reach across the Alpha Quadrant. Hundreds of species live in harmony and cooperate together to operate the Federation and its military arm, Starfleet. Many governments of varying attitudes and governing styles call the Federation home. However, there are some governments that might not make that transition so gracefully. Some governments just aren’t well-suited to giving up their autonomy and becoming just one part of a larger whole. They may be too paranoid or too independently-minded to give up their power to a higher organization. Others might consider some of the core ideals of the Federation too restrictive. Joining the post-scarcity Federation without a strong unified currency would be a hard sell for the business-friendly Ferengi. Many of the enemies and allies of the Federation probably wouldn’t smoothly transition from autonomous government to Federation member. This week’s poll asks you which government you think could make the change easiest. Would the Klingon Empire be able to set aside their more aggressive military policies and merge together with Starfleet? How much work would have to be done to reform Cardassia’s government until it could be accepted? The change would be difficult for any of them, and some might not be able to do it. Which government do you think would make the easiest transition into Federation membership? Let us know what you think below!
  6. The worst has finally happened- the alternate future seen in The Next Generation episode “Parallels” has come to pass. The Federation is no more, the Borg are swarming the Alpha Quadrant, and the only thing holding them at bay is Riker’s uncontrollable beard. Amidst this madness, you are determined to survive at any cost. But you can’t do it alone! In this desperate hour, you need a security officer by your side that you can trust, someone who has served Starfleet faithfully. The list is long and varied, and you may use any canon security officer from any time period. With that in mind, who would you pick? The disciplined yet somewhat trigger happy Malcolm Reed? Worf, who’s hand to hand skills might be extremely useful? Maybe a Changeling might be your style- Odo would be a formidable ally. Or perhaps you’d prefer a random redshirt from The Original Series- hey, if they’re focused on him, they’re not focused on you. This week’s poll asks you which security officer you’d want at your side the most in an apocalypse. Give us your vote, and let us know your rational in the comments section below!
  7. In Star Trek most members of the crew interact off duty as well as during their regularly assigned duties. Entire stories can be based around the interactions between the crew when there isn’t a Romulan warbird or an exploding star driving the action. While some members of the crew are simply colleagues or may even dislike each other, others share a much stronger bond. Aboard Deep Space Nine, if you see Doctor Bashir it’s a good bet that Chief O’Brien is nearby. Whether they are storming the Alamo together or playing darts in Quark’s the two are almost inseparable. Meanwhile, aboard the Enterprise D, Captain Picard could always turn to his old friend Guinan for advice. In the 23rd century, Captain Kirk and Commander Spock went through a lot together. They stuck together throughout their historic mission of exploration that saw them encounter all manners of hostile aliens, new civilizations, and even sent them back in time on multiple occasions. These trials forged a strong friendship between the two that went far beyond colleagues or even captain and first officer. This week’s poll asks you to look back at the friendships between characters that developed throughout the franchise and pick your favorite. Let us know which was your favorite friendship below!
  8. Happy Halloween everyone! Previously, a poll of the week asked what your favorite scary episode of Star Trek is. This week we wanted to envision what a pure horror story would look like in the Star Trek universe. Typically, when an episode tells a horror story it is usually through a monster or strange anomaly haunting the crew. However, horror is not traditionally focused on powerful characters in an advanced military ship. Horror is about the characters being forced to overcome an unknown superior force, be it a masked killer or a ghost haunting their home. One of the most important parts of a horror story is the location. Often these places are secluded, dangerous, or associated with bad history. Haunted mansions, abandoned hospitals or asylums, and isolated places out in the woods are all popular choices. If Star Trek ever produced a standalone horror story, what would be a frightening or secluded setting? Space provides no shortage of hazardous environments that could make for threatening settings for a story. Perhaps a ghost-like anomaly could haunt the two-person crew in the cramped quarters of a relay station or some alien monster of the week could try to drive a group of colonists off of its planet. What location in the Star Trek universe do you think would make the best horror story setting?
  9. There’s no shortage of starship classes within the fleet. It seems that almost every mission has the perfect vehicle to achieve it. Operations that necessitate tactical ability can look to the nimble firepower of the Defiant class. Long forays into the depths of uncharted space are ideal for the massive explorers of the Federation- the Galaxy and Odyssey classes. And, of course, once those tactical aims have been achieved, or those planets have been explored, science/medical ships are needed, and that niche is filled by the Olympic class medical cruiser, or the Nova class science surveyor. Of course, these are just the barest descriptions of the hundreds of mandates nd tens of thousands of operations that the Federation contends with on a daily basis, but it seems like every niche is filled with an appropriate type of ship, with the ASDB working hard to fill in whatever gaps may exist. With that said, every style of command is different, and befits a different mission. This poll of the week asks you to consider your character’s particular style, their strengths and their weaknesses to answer this question: “Given the opportunity to choose, which type of starship would your character choose to command?” Are they more of a fighter, befitting a posting to a combat vessel like the Defiant class? Would they thrive as the CO of a deep space explorer, like the Galaxy class? Or would they fit more into a support role- say, a medical frigate or even a starbase? Perhaps they don’t fit into any of the above? Whatever you decide, give us your vote, and let us know your reasoning in the comments section below!
  10. The name says it all. In an organization as diverse, multifaceted and accepting as Starfleet, there’s bound to be a variety of different reasons to make the commitment to the fleet. For some, it’s the mission itself. More noble goals than Starfleet’s are difficult to come by, and their pursuit contributes to the expansion, continuation and improvement of an astonishing interstellar civilization. Other characters might have joined out of a sense of familial obligation. The fleet has been around in some form or fashion for centuries, and a tradition of service exists in many families, sometimes reaching back three, four or even five generations. Some might feel a desire or a need to protect the Federation, especially considering the many conflicts and dangers that exist in the not so empty depths of space. Other, less personal reasons might have been an impetus as well. Serving aboard a starship is an excellent way to get the feel for a society, and appreciate its positive and negative aspects. This is especially true with newly discovered species, or those that wish to be the first of their kind in a Starfleet uniform. The reasons are, naturally, varied, and can say a great deal about a character before we even get to know them. With that in mind, what was your characters’ impetus to join Starfleet? Was it a desire to contribute to the Federation and be a part of something bigger? Was it to protect and defend? Explore? Something not mentioned here? Give us your vote and let us know in the comments section below!
  11. Starfleet officers are saddled with an immense amount of responsibility. It seems like each day is just another chance to be vaporized, tortured, spaced, sucked into a black hole, or anything else in the pantheon of untimely demises. And yet, the beloved organization of exploration and defense grows its ranks and carries on a legacy of honor and optimism- boldly going where no one has gone before. These risks are accepted by all aboard, but there seems to be one duty description more hazardous and unpredictable than any other- First Contact specialists. A variety of Star Trek episodes show us what happens when first contact goes horribly wrong- namely, “Tin Man”, in which an entire Starfleet landing team was massacred due to a cultural misunderstanding. Indeed, the risks and dangers of First Contact, and the numerous ways it can be performed poorly, inspired Starfleet to insist on creating General Order 1- the Prime Directive. While this mitigated certain issues, the fact that someone would still need to speak for the entire Federation in truly precarious situations remained. Starfleet captains are particularly sought for, among other things, the ability to diplomatically and tactfully introduce an entirely new race to the people of the United Federation of Planets. Only nerves of steel can handle this job. With that in mind, do you believe your character would be comfortable handling First Contact situations on a regular basis? Would they relish the importance and the strain? Would they collapse under pressure? Perhaps something in between? Give us your vote and let us know in the comments section below!
  12. The transporter was originally invented out of necessity. With away teams going to and from alien planets regularly, the team behind Star Trek needed a way to get them to the ship and back again. They had shuttles that could solve this problem. Unfortunately, this wasn’t a feasible option. Landing a shuttle every episode would have been too much for the show’s limited budget. Instead the transporter was born. In the years since the transporter has remained, but small craft of all kinds have gained a more prominent role in the series with new shows. Starfleet has access to more than just the normal shuttles used to ferry landing parties from the ship to a planet. They also have larger runabouts for longer trips, attack fighters for combat, and workbees and other maintenance craft to name a few. The runabout did play a major role in Deep Space Nine, but attack fighters and workbees rarely play a part beyond appearing in the background. Both the Enterprise-D and Voyager featured special auxiliary craft (the captain’s yacht and the aeroshuttle respectively) but neither were ever used. Are the small crafts of Star Trek underutilized? Would you like to see shuttles and fighters used in new and interesting ways, or do you like them the way they are? What do you think of the way Star Trek uses small craft?
  13. They can’t all be from Starfleet! Certainly, our beloved crews are the main focus of virtually every episode of Star Trek, in some form or another. However, while interpersonal relationships and conflict are featured, it is generally an outside force or character that sets the tone of the episode, and the events that occur. Star Trek has a bad, though not entirely unearned, reputation for “one-off” characters- created simply to hammer home a message or make an otherwise improbable story believable. And then there are the regulars- characters that show up from time to time and have, in many cases, become as beloved by fans as the bridge staff themselves (sometimes even more so). How many times did Marc Alaimo’s brilliantly complex Gul Dukat entertain and intrigue us with his villainous (or not so villainous) ways? Who could forget the insidious, dangerous Weyoun, demure and alternatively vicious in the blink of an eye? And of course, there is the almighty Q to consider, the only antagonist to try the patience of three separate starship crews on screen. Really, though- what other fabulous being could earn such a distinction? Supporting characters are a must in Trek, and though their names might not appear in the opening crawl, their importance and regard cannot be overstated. With this in mind, which was your favorite supporting character in Star Trek? Was it the brusque but likable General Martok? Or did Garek the simple tailor strike your fancy? Perhaps someone not listed below is your choice. Give us your vote and let us know in the comments section below! ((Note: To be considered a supporting actor in this list, they must have appeared in at least two episodes across the various series.))
  14. Due to declining ratings for season two of the original Star Trek, it was rumored that NBC was planning to cancel the series. This prompted a letter-writing campaign that kept the show on the air for one more season. While not every Star Trek series was faced with such an early ending, no television show can go on forever. One by one each new Star Trek series told its story, aired its final episode, and the franchise moved on to new things. The staff behind these shows did their best to wrap things up well. However, that doesn’t stop us from asking what they would do with another season on the air. The upcoming Deep Space Nine documentary What We Left Behind hopes to share the original plan for the story of a hypothetical season eight. For the most part it is up to the imaginations of fans to guess how future seasons of Star Trek could have unfolded. We may never know for sure what any particular series would have done if it stayed on the air longer, but it is interesting to envision what could have been nonetheless. We want to know which main Star Trek series you would have most liked to see be given a little more time to tell its stories. The possibilities are endless. Deep Space Nine left the galaxy recovering from an incredibly destructive war with all the possible stories that situation could spawn. Enterprise could have gone on to give us our first real look at the war between the Romulan Star Empire and humanity. Which series do you think had more incredible tales to tell? Which Star Trek series would you want to see have one more season? Tell us what your choice would be below!
  15. On September 8th, 1966 the original series of Star Trek premiered on NBC. Despite being intended as a later episode in the series, the episode “The Man Trap” was chosen to be the premiere episode for its horror-like plot. As the anniversary of Star Trek’s US premiere approaches, we reflected on how much the franchise has grown over the past fifty-one (a few days away from fifty-two) years. Star Trek has expanded to include a handful of television series, fourteen movies, and countless other spin-off works. The franchise has many fans across the world, presumably including the members of this group. Each of us got our love of Star Trek from somewhere, and we all have our own reasons for liking it so much. Why anyone is a fan of a particular series is a matter of personal feelings and how they look at the series. We want to hear from you about why you love Star Trek. Given how personal the answer to that question will be for everyone, this week’s poll is going to be a bit different. There are no answer choices. There is only the question. What is Star Trek to you? Let us know what the series means to you and why you love it below!
  16. Faith has always been a delicate question, one that Star Trek often enjoys examining. It’s no secret that Gene Roddenberry, creator of the idea for Star Trek, found religions to be undesirable, and this fact reflected quite clearly in many of the episodes produced under his tenure. That said, there have been a variety of installments that discuss the topic of faith in a balanced matter. Deep Space 9’s Kira Nerys proudly proclaims a spiritual relationship, and there have been other characters, both in Starfleet and elsewhere, that live similarly. On a starship or starbase, teeming with hundreds or thousands of people, cultural differences are unavoidably abundant, and part of what makes Starfleet such an incredible organization. That said, from a writer’s perspective, the storytelling and character development possibilities that stem from imbuing one’s character with religious leanings are boundless. On the other hand, a lack of religion can be just as influential for a character, helping to shape their worldview and their priorities. This week’s poll is simple. Essentially, does your character follow a set religion or faith? Are they believers of the Bajoran Prophets, or the Ferengi Rules of Acquisition? Perhaps they were raised in such a fashion, but let that fall away as they grew older. Maybe they have an undefined faith, or an agnostic approach to the universe, or they find religion undesirable for any number of reasons. Give us your vote, and if you’re feeling generous, offer a bit of explanation in the comments section!
  17. The looks of many visual elements in Star Trek have changed over the years. One of the most prominent and famous changes is the design of the Klingon species. At first, Klingons were barely distinguishable from humans. This stayed the same throughout the first series but first changed in the original Star Trek movie. This was when the original change was made and Klingons got their trademark forehead ridges. The look of the Klingons remained mostly the same from that point until the movie Into Darkness. This movie changed the look of Klingons but retained the basic design scheme. The next change came with Discovery, where the Klingon species went through a major redesign. That brings the current count of Klingon makeup designs to four. These sudden changes in the appearance of a major species did not go unnoticed. A few episodes even tried to explain where these sudden forehead ridges came from. The question of visual continuity is a complex one. Each series of Star Trek has made changes and introduced its own visual style, but for the most part major elements of Star Trek remain relatively visually similar. Special effects and prosthetic makeup have improved since Star Trek first aired. Some people might argue that these innovation should be used, while others would prefer that the vision of Star Trek’s original creators be preserved. This poll of the week asks you what you think. Do you care about the visual continuity of the Klingons? Let us know what your take on the issue is!
  18. The United Federation of Planets, most people will agree, is a vision of utopia unparalleled in its progressive stances on the different denominations that compose it, and in its wealth of resources, knowledge and altruistic endeavors. In the two and half centuries since its founding, the Federation has included 150 member worlds and thousands of outlying colonies within its ranks. Likewise, it has also encountered a multitude of other species- specifically, other governments and cultures. The Klingon Empire, the Romulan Star Empire, the Cardassian Union, the Ferengi Alliance, the Breen Confederacy, and the Tholian Assembly compose the rest of the Alpha Quadrant principle powers. As we’ve seen, each one has a distinctive outlook on the universe, and a unique culture to match. The Klingons (especially the more militaristic branch) can be exceptionally brutal, violent and beholden to a strictly maintained code of honor. The Romulans have a similarly militaristic view, this one tinged with the more disreputable side of combat (assassinations, political machinations, etc.) but they also seem to have a deep appreciation for both art and scientific endeavors, setting them apart from their longtime enemy, the Klingons. The Ferengi are well known as the entrepreneurs and merchants of the quadrant, living in a society where money is more than a means to a goal- it is the goal. The Breen are a deeply secretive race, with conflicting reports about everything from their home planet to the reason for their all-encompassing uniforms. They became a household name during the Dominion War, when they sided with the Founders against the Federation/Klingon/Romulan alliance, and nearly shattered the Alpha Quadrant once and for all. The Tholians are even more reclusive, and they take it to a xenophobic degree. These crystalline arthropods exist in temperatures that rival Y-Class Demon Worlds in there extremity. Lastly, and perhaps the most intricate blend of the aforementioned, the Cardassian Union has struggled to find a balance between enlightened artistic and spiritual quests and militaristic domination, creating a world of intriguing but often damaging contradictions, where the citizens are both the enemy and the strength of the civilization. This poll asks you to consider the possibilities if you were not born into a Federation world. If you had a choice, which would you be a full citizen of? Would the rigid discipline and warrior lifestyle of the Klingons suit you, or would you be more at home among the financially-motivated Ferengi? Perhaps citizenship as a Cardassian appeals to you. Or maybe you fancy satiating your curiosity, and would enjoy learning more about the Breen. Give us your vote, and let us know your thoughts in the comments section below!
  19. So often, Starfleet officers are asked to do the impossible. Life in Starfleet is full of daunting challenges that would push anyone to their limits. At any moment a temporal rift or a surprise attack by the Borg could test the worth of the crew of a Starfleet ship. You could fill a book with strange encounters and difficult missions just by following the career of a single ship. Across the entire organization of Starfleet the impossible happens every day. While these herculean tasks often test the entire ship, they can also be the responsibility of a single officer. There is perhaps no greater example of this trend than Scotty. Every other week he was being asked to pull the Enterprise from the jaws of defeat to victory. Scotty truly earned his reputation as a miracle worker through the countless times he saved the day at the last minute with his technical skill and unbelievable luck. This week’s poll presents several scenarios that would challenge the best of the best and asks you to choose which you would find to be the biggest trial. The challenges included cover a variety of different specialties from the nightmares of catering for a galactic diplomatic reception to packing the punch of a Galaxy-class into a vessel that's well over a century old. Which do you think is the most difficult to handle? Let us know your thoughts below!
  20. Kirk. Picard. Sisko. Janeway. Archer. These names are familiar to even the most casual observer, and synonymous with Starfleet as a whole. Whether they were there to witness (or have a hand in!) the birth of the Federation itself, or contributed to its success hundreds of years later, each officer has left an indelible and valuable mark on the captains of tomorrow. While the historical archives might praise these pioneers justly, it becomes apparent just how many differences existed in their personal styles of command. James Kirk, arguably the most famous captain in Federation history, was well known for his bold yet studious personality. Under his skilled leadership, the original Constitution class Enterprise completed its five year mission of exploration- an achievement not many of his fellow starship captains had lived to boast about. However, he also bore a reputation for stretching, bending, and even flat out breaking regulations and rules when it suited him. This rebellious nature, though beneficial in a variety of instances, chafed on many, and could lead to injuries. Likewise, Benjamin Sisko, widely regarded as one of the most important captains during the Dominion War, bears great praise from historians for his actions. A patriot and a defender of what he cherished most, Sisko did not allow any to interfere with his station or his Federation unopposed. This could, on occasion, lead him into what might be considered excessive, or even ruthless behavior. One need only examine his actions when it came to eliminating the Maquis threat in the Cardassian Neutral Zone for proof of this particular personality trait. There are pros and cons to every style of leadership, and the 5 Captains lend credence to this conclusion. That said, this week’s poll asks you to consider which of the five television captain’s you’d be least happy serving with. Would you find Picard’s insular, isolated obsession with Shakespeare a poor match to your own tastes? Or would you prefer to avoid Archer’s (at times) entitled and naive attitude regarding the galaxy around him? Perhaps Janeway’s unpredictable, and occasionally reckless actions would inspire you to maintain your distance? Give us your vote, and let us know in the comments section below!
  21. When a new Star Trek series is on the horizon, the question of what the show will look like is always at the forefront of speculation. Will the show borrow visuals from previous shows or carve a new direction for itself? Recently the divergent design aesthetics between The Original Series and Discovery have been a topic of great debate among fans. Changes to sets, props, costumes, and makeup have given Discovery its own unique visual style rather than embracing the visuals of the Kirk era. With seven television series and more than a dozen movies, there is no shortage of design aesthetics as the various directors and artists have taken the direction of the show’s visuals in new and interesting directions. Everyone is bound to have their personal favorite look for the show. Today's poll asks you which design aesthetic you liked the most. Is the original still the best, or do you prefer the new changes made by Discovery? Let us know what your favorite Star Trek design aesthetic is in this week's poll!
  22. The term “flag officer” stems from more primitive years of Earth’s warfighting period, when ships bearing a fleet’s highest ranking officer (ostensibly a commodore or higher) would indicate this fact by flying a certain pennant or ensign. Despite such methods being outdated by 400+ years, the term persists at least into the end of the 24th century, and instead has come to denote someone of great experience and wisdom within the higher echelons of Starfleet. That said, there’s a common theme running through much of canon Star Trek; despite their lofty positions and sizable achievements, many of the flag officers portrayed aren’t all that great. In some cases, they’re simply breathtakingly incompetent. This is exemplified best by Commodore George Stalker, who decided not only to declare himself in command of the Enterprise, but then proceeded to violate the Romulan Neutral Zone. This is especially egregious, considering he had not one iota of starship command experience under his belt, having served as an administrator all of his career. In other, more malicious cases, flag officers have chosen to betray Federation principles and the safety of Starfleet personnel in the pursuit of, among other things, the greater good. An example of the above might be found in DS9’s “Homefront”, in which Admiral Leyton recruits the members of Starfleet Academy Red Squad to sabotage the planetary defense network of Earth during the Dominion War. Another is Admiral Mark Jameson, who violated the Prime Directive by providing weapons to a hostage-taker in return for securing their release, an decision that led to forty years of brutal civil war on the planet Mordan IV. While there are plenty of examples of flag officers standing tall, and representing the finest Starfleet has to offer ( Admiral Alana Nechayev, Commodore Stone, etc.), this poll asks you to weigh the actions of these infamous individuals, and decide- who is the worst flag officer in Starfleet history? Was it the duplicitous Erik Pressman, who oversaw the development of a phase cloaking device in direct violation of the Treaty of Algeron, and in doing so, nearly incited war with the Romulans? Or perhaps you’re dead set against Admiral Cartwright, who conspired to assassinate the Federation President, and thereby sabotage the Khitomer Accords. Maybe you’re thinking of someone completely different- there are so many examples that it’s almost impossible to factor them all. Give us your vote, and let us know your reasoning in the comments section below!
  23. The unlucky day of Friday the 13th is almost upon us, and that has brought to mind the subject of bad luck. There are many ways people say you can find misfortune. A black cat crossing your path is a popular sign of bad luck. It’s said that breaking a mirror will bring you seven years of misfortune. Walking underneath a ladder or opening an umbrella indoors are both considered unlucky actions, not to mention just plain unsafe things to do. If you want a real example of bad luck, you need only look at some of the fates that befall Starfleet officers. You could fall out into space through a hull breach. Some unlucky souls have been infected with rare alien viruses that are uncomfortable at best and downright horrifying at worst. Time travel or transit through different dimensions could strand someone in any number of unusual realities. There is also always the looming threat of everyday risks from combat with hostile aliens to transporter accidents. There’s no shortage of misfortune that can happen to a member of Starfleet, especially if said officer isn’t named and is wearing a red shirt. However, fate seems happy to pile the misfortune on to some main characters more than others. It would be bad enough to be abducted, be tormented by a clown, or constantly fail to get a well-deserved promotion. All three, and more? It might seem like the universe just has it out for you. Some Star Trek main characters have even been killed, only to find out that not even death can end their streak of bad luck. This week’s poll asks you which character you think always seemed to be dealt the worst hand by fate. Who do you think was the unluckiest main character in Star Trek?
  24. Sometimes a change in scenery can be a welcome bit of variety in a life so often controlled by routines. Life on a Starfleet ship is certainly a life with many routines and schedules. While ships often have shore leave, even this takes place at a nearby port of call. Sometimes a Starfleet officer just needs to take extended leave and get away from everything. Even the most dedicated of officers like Jean-Luc Picard needed to take a vacation every once in a while. Luckily when it’s time to plan a trip the galaxy offers no shortage of potential destinations. Everyone has their own preferences when it comes to an ideal vacation. One person might prefer a quiet, uneventful trip while another might find a short stay in the crowded metropolis of the Klingon First City much more enjoyable. Planets like Risa are incredibly popular destinations, but they aren’t for everyone. There are those who would pick touring historic battlefields or museums over a trip to the beach every time. If your character had to take extended shore leave, where would they go?
  25. The nominations have been examined, the recipients have been decided upon, and the ceremony has ended! The 2018 SB118 Awards Show has been a beautiful success! Writers from all across the fleet have been recognized for their fantastic contributions to our magnificent group. There’s a glow of contentment as people offer hearty congratulations and update their wiki pages accordingly. And then, if you’re anything like me, it feels as if Christmas has past, and there can be a lull during this time. So! Because I’m not quite ready to let go of awards season, I thought I’d add a last, more unofficial part to the festivities. In my own nominating experience, while there are a great many suitable and intriguing awards to put people in for, there are many things members of this fleet do that might not necessarily have an appropriate recognition. With that in mind, this poll asks you to consider what, if any, new awards you’d like to see in next year’s ceremony. Perhaps you’ve been extremely impressed with someone’s writing prowess in a way that doesn’t have an award tied to it, or maybe they’ve already earned the one that exists for it. Maybe you’d like to honor the more OOC aspect of things- there’s a plentiful list of tasks that get little to no attention in the grand scheme. Have something completely different in mind? Think there are plenty of awards already? Let us know in the comments section below!
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