Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'polls'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Welcome to our forums!
    • Board Rules and News
  • Applications and Training
    • Prospective Members
    • Academy Training
    • Graduation Hall
  • Hall of Honor
    • Appreciations
    • Awards Ceremonies
    • Contest archives
  • News & Updates
    • Community News
    • Ship Mission Reports
    • FNS Headlines
  • Community Discussion
    • Trek Discussion
    • Poll of the Week
  • Community Collaboration
    • Graphics requests and Image Resources
    • Teams
    • Squadrons
    • Guilds
    • Duty Posts

Calendars

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Location


Interests


Current Post


Wiki user URL


Wiki character URL

  1. There is no shortage of alien species in Star Trek. However, at times a species can lack a certain level of cultural complexity. Alien races in science fiction tend to become singular, monolithic entities without much variation or development outside of the defining features of their species. The Klingons are warriors obsessed with honor and combat, and this is reflected in almost all aspects of them that we see on screen. Everything on Ferenginar, including ideas of the afterlife, are wrapped up in business and the acquisition of profit. The Vulcans are always collected and logical. Despite this, Star Trek does manage to give its aliens a fair amount of development and worldbuilding to help make them feel more realistic. We learn more about the major players in the Alpha Quadrant and beyond both through storylines featuring them and in how specific characters like Worf grow and develop over time. Which species do you think was the best-developed and least one-note? Be sure to cast your vote!
  2. Not even Starfleet officers can be brilliant at everything. The years upon years of schooling Academy cadets undergo are grueling to be sure, but, upon graduation, the vast majority of new ensigns are qualified for one department alone. Beyond the fact that the education required to succeed as an officer on a Federation starship or facility is extraordinarily demanding, cadets almost always have some sort of personal preference that helps them decide what path they want to pursue. Skills, goals, and demeanor all have a bearing on what service the ensign will end up providing. This week’s poll asks you to name the department or position that your character would be least adept at. Would their brawny, combative nature make a career in the medical department a struggle? Perhaps their dislike of violence would lead away from the security team? Give us your vote, and let us know in the comments section below!
  3. Starfleet seems to have a problem with keeping their ships safe. In a fight between ships, a Starfleet ship can usually hold its own. The problems begin when someone gets on the ship. Starfleet Security has demonstrated time and time again that it might be just a little bit too trusting. Starfleet ships have been hijacked by just about every group imaginable. The Maquis, Klingons, Romulans, and Bynars are all among the many powers who have successfully commandeered Starfleet ships. The flagship of the Federation itself was once taken over by a group of Ferengi in a few surplus Klingon ships. It doesn’t even end there. Security protocols are easily bypassed by the officers and civilians aboard the ship. If you want to avoid being tracked, all you need to do is remove your combadge. At one point, a civilian was able to escape the ship in a shuttle without assistance or permission from anyone. People could be replaced by changelings for months and avoid having their identities or their acts of sabotage being discovered. However, not every ship had this problem to the same degree. There are some threats that can’t be prepared for. No security is entirely foolproof. This week, we want to hear your thoughts on the issue. Which series featured the worst ship security? Be sure to cast your vote below!
  4. Ah, that most pervasive of internet staples. It seems that every show and every character has been featured on these loose personality organizers at least once, and Star Trek has been of particular focus. Though I personally believe that trying to shove an entire individual into nine categories is all but impossible, the struggle to pick between separate and distinctive parts of a personality can lead to some fantastic insight. This week’s poll asks you what alignment your character would best fall under? Are they a chaotic individual, striving for good? Perhaps they have a more detached personality, and appreciate lawfulness over all else. Whatever you decide for your character, give us your vote and explain away in the comments section below!
  5. One of the biggest steps in a Starfleet officer’s career is the promotion to the rank of captain. Given that such a promotion might come with a change in assignment and a ship or station to command, this isn’t a promotion we often see in the middle of a series. While members of the senior staff may evolve as characters and move through the ranks, we don’t really see them take that final step. However, we occasionally see glimpses of the possible future where a character like Nog or Doctor Crusher has become the captain of their own ship. These alternate timelines only last for an episode or two before things return to the status quo. A new series is currently in the works that follows the continued adventures of Captain Picard. Michael Dorn has pitched a series that follows Worf as a captain. This week, we want you to imagine that you are making a new sequel series and choose which character you’d promote and put in command. Would you want to see more of Captain Sulu? Perhaps a series set further in the future with an older and more experienced Nog or Harry Kim would be more to your liking. Which character would you cast as the captain for a new Star Trek series?
  6. If there was a single recurring character that (at least at first glance) seems to embody the very antithesis of Star Trek’s sweeping vision, it would be Quark. The scheming, capitalistic, sexist Ferengi is truly despicable from the very beginning of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, and shamelessly displays his materialistic mindset at every turn. Even so, over the course of seven seasons, Quark managed to work his way into the hearts of viewers. His development throughout the series is undeniable and one of the many treats audiences were able to enjoy. What was once a mostly shelved idea for a villainous species was given life through Quark and his fellow Ferengi characters. His popularity is best exemplified by the numerous episodes that had Quark as a focus. Though some of them were truly malignant (looking at you, “Profit and Lace”) the vast majority were effective, meaningful, and often hilarious. This week’s poll asks which Quark moment or episode you found most enjoyable! Give us your vote and let us know your thinking in the comments section!
  7. Love it or hate it, you can’t deny that Star Trek: Discovery has been enormously polarizing, both for critics and the dedicated fanbase. The controversy stems from almost every part of Discovery itself; the appearance, the story, the characters, and much more. For all the debate it creates, Discovery is hardly the first Star Trek series to stimulate some level of discord. The Original Series was the first of its kind, both in story style and in presentation. The racial equality, ethical musing and divisive political perspectives presented made it a bold and, in some cases, threatening television show. The Animated Series generally featured decent stories, but the animation itself was a turnoff for some of the audience. The Next Generation was greeted with disgust and apprehension from many old school fans, who couldn’t believe that it would match the original. Deep Space Nine’s grungier, darker tone bucked the utopian staple that Star Trek so firmly clutched. Voyager and Enterprise are both loved and hated by various fans, mostly for the content and direction of their stories. This week’s poll asks you to pick the series you thought was most controversial. Give us your vote, and let us know your thoughts in the comments section!
  8. Insurance for Starfleet ships would be a nightmare. The ships are constantly investigating dangerous anomalies and getting into fights. But that’s not even the most dangerous thing that a Starfleet ship does. There’s a less obvious danger hidden in plain sight on most Starfleet ships. A piece of technology that is so ridiculously prone to failure or malfunction that it is one of the best-known Star Trek cliches. Of course, this is the holodeck. It would seem that every time an episode centers on the holodeck, something has to go wrong with it. This could be as simple as the doors locking and the safety protocols turning off. However, that is only the start of what could go wrong with the holodeck. It could even, with a little outside interference, take on a mind of its own and actively try to hunt you down and kill you. We can only assume that the engineers responsible for the holodeck safety protocols are the same engineers responsible for the tendency of bridge consoles to explode. There are a lot of problems that could be pointed to in the holodeck’s safeguards. Which holodeck malfunction do you think was the worst? Let us know your thoughts on the holodeck’s safety below!
  9. The best soundtracks in films are those that match and enhance the ambiance and themes presented on the screen. In this regard, Star Trek composers have had a particularly difficult job- how do you compress wonder, mystery, and beauty into small auditory snippets? Fortunately for us fans, it seems that each movie in the Star Trek franchise has been graced with a phenomenal musical accompaniment. Whether it’s the introspective, grand and powerful themes from the Motion Picture, or the pulsating, action-filled tunes from the nuTrek movies, there’s something for everyone. This week’s poll asks you to name your favorite movie soundtrack. Give us your vote, and let us know what you chose in the comments section below!
  10. The most important aspect of the overall story of Voyager was the distance of their journey back home to the Alpha Quadrant. Shortening the distance that the ship had to travel, or even returning to Earth immediately was a frequent plot device in Voyager episodes. It seems like at least once a season there is the potential of some shortcut getting the crew back home only to not work out or only take them part of the way. On one occasion this desire to find an alternate way home got the ship stuck in a trap they thought was a wormhole. It’s understandable that there were occasional episodes centered around this idea. Sometimes it was a good idea to shave time off of the trip like in the episode “Night” where the ship had to get clear of an empty void of space thousands of light years across or in the finale “Endgame”. However, it will appear in a story from time to time where it isn’t related to the primary plot. Sometimes the plot device of a shortcut to Earth was just used to raise the stakes of an episode and was never mentioned again. This week, we want to know which Voyager shortcut you felt was the least necessary for the episode. Let us know your answer below!
  11. Weddings. Whether you’re throwing rice at the bride and groom or beating them over the head with Ma’Stakas, they are generally happy occasions, and symbolize a sacred union between two people. From the first (aborted) marriage of Robert Tomlinson and Angela Martine aboard the Enterprise NCC 1701, to the long-awaited conjugation of Deanna Troi and William Riker, Star Trek has a long tradition of showing such ceremonies on the screen. Each has taken a different tone, different visual style and, of course, different participants. This poll asks you which of the many marriage ceremonies shown on screen was your favorite. Did you enjoy the Japanese-styled ceremony of Miles O’Brien and Keiko Ishikawa? Or were the somber, aggressive overtones of Worf and Jadzia Dax’s wedding more to your taste? Perhaps the less than romantic civil union imposed upon Quark by the widow Grilka struck the right tone. Give us your vote and explain your choice in the comments section below.
  12. The holodeck is one of the most versatile pieces of technology at Starfleet’s disposal. When you use the holodeck, there is a nearly limitless amount of resources at your disposal. Any item in the database from a wine glass to a shuttlecraft can be recreated by the computer. Characters with artificial personalities can be added in to either create a particular atmosphere or act out a story. The walls and floor with the yellow grid on them can become any number of vistas or locations from across the galaxy with the push of a button. Everything is controlled by the ship’s computer, adapting the program as it goes along to provide whatever the user is looking for. Holodecks are primarily an outlet for crew recreation, but they have many other uses as well. Aspects of the Delta Flyer were originally designed and simulated using the holodeck. Authors can make a living by writing holonovels. In some cases we’ve even seen holodecks used in group therapy sessions or to covertly test someone’s loyalty to the Federation. In this week’s poll, we want to know what your character most frequently does when they use the holodeck. Do they save the world from evil villains and take part in historical battles, or are they more likely to utilize the holodeck when they’re trying to simulate a project or need to do some training exercises? What does your character use the holodeck for most? Cast your vote and let us know below!
  13. It’s rather surprising to realize just how many relationships in Star Trek are principally parent/child based. In most cases, these connections between beloved characters has yielded fantastic character building episodes, while often posing intriguing philosophical questions. Since the first episode to feature an example of this trend, TOS’ “Journey to Babel”, in which Spock must confront the burden of command and the needs of his family, a long standing tradition has been maintained. Whether the relationship exists for a short time (such as in the TNG episode “The Offspring”) or for the length of an entire series (Benjamin and Jake Sisko), they almost always manage to add heart to a show that can sometimes feel clinical and dry. This week’s poll asks you which parent/child relationship in Star Trek you found most interesting. Give us your vote, and let us know your reasons in the comment section below!
  14. The ships created by the major powers of the galaxy each have their own unique characteristics and design schemes that identify who they belong to. The Romulans, Cardassians, Klingons, and Ferengi all have very distinct styles of ship design. However, most ships share the same essential elements. There is almost always a bridge, some form of energy and projectile weapons, both warp and sublight engines, and basic living spaces for the ship’s crew. All of these features come standard for starships all over the galaxy. Beyond unique design styles, most factions also have their own special technologies that are seen as trademarks of their fleets. Both the Romulans and Klingons equipped their ships with their own versions of cloaking devices. The Breen were feared for their unique energy dampening weapon that turned the Second Battle of Chin’toka into a decisive defeat for the Federation, Klingons, and Romulans. There were also non-standard features that were unique to certain classes of ship. The USS Prometheus had a revolutionary new multi-vector assault mode that could turn one ship into three built on older saucer separation technology. If you were designing a starship, you would have to include all of the standard features in the design. But no ship has room for all of the optional extra technologies that are seen on starships across the galaxy. A ship that was transwarp-capable, cloaked, multi-vector assault mode equipped, and armed with special weapons would likely never hold together. Ships like the USS Defiant show that an over-specialized ship stuffed with advanced technology was an engineering nightmare to keep running. If you were designing a starship, which non-standard feature would be at the top of your list? Let us know what your first choice would be below!
  15. There are an enormous number of inter-series cameos in Star Trek, and more often than not, they’re delightful treats, designed to connect and further flesh out a universe so massive it might otherwise become tangled and unfollowable. Quark and William Riker have enjoyed a number of these appearances, but for this particular poll, we’ll be focusing on those moments where characters from the original Enterprise were featured. Dr. Leonard McCoy’s tour of the Enterprise D is the first of these shown in the pilot episode for TNG, later followed by Ambassador Spock and his attempts to reunite the Romulan people with their Vulcan brothers in “Unification Parts I and II”. The discovery of Montgomery Scott’s shuttle on the Jenolan Dyson Sphere was the focus of the TNG episode “Relics”. Additionally, Sarek (featured in the aforementioned episode, shortly after appearing as a titular character in the previous season of TNG) helped to connect the old to the new, and to pass on a well-known legacy. Finally, in one of the most popular episodes of Voyager, Hikaru Sulu, shown in a memory as the captain of the Excelsior, and Janice Rand, provide excellent background information into Tuvok’s past, while adding some much need variety to the show’s stories. Of these appearances, which was your favorite? Give us your vote, and explain away in the comments section!
  16. Of all the famous Starfleet captains, there are few who have made as many controversial decisions as Captain Jonathan Archer of the NX-01. Archer’s Enterprise was the first Warp Five starship built by Humans. It was Earth’s first deep space explorer, and Starfleet itself was still a fairly new and inexperienced organization. Captain Archer did not have any of the benefits that future Starfleet captains enjoyed. He had access to less data, was a member of Starfleet when the organization was relatively weak, and didn’t have the experience of previous Starfleet captains to call on as he was the first to go out into the unexplored reaches of space. Archer would eventually serve as a role model for his successors, teaching them both what to do and what not to do. Mistakes, even major mistakes, have happened with every captain. Some have even acted in a criminal manner. Some of Captain Archer’s decisions do make some sense given the lack of precedent and his limited experience. However, there are some decisions that seem to indicate a simple lack of good command skills. The use of an airlock to torture a prisoner is just one example. We’d like to know what you think of the command decisions of one of Starfleet’s earliest captains. What do you think is the worst thing that Captain Archer did?
  17. For all the work they do exploring and saving the Federation from endless threats, it seems our beloved crews don’t get anywhere near enough shore leave. Nevertheless, when it is shown, more often than not, the results is excellent television. With the first episode to fit this bill- aptly titled “Shore Leave”- a precedent was set, one that episodes following it would generally honor. “Shore Leave” itself is often lauded by fans as a fun romp, and a standout of TOS’ first season. “Captain’s Holiday” features uptight and work-addicted Jean-Luc Picard become embroiled in a time-bending adventure on Risa. “Family”, another offering from TNG, this time hailing from the fourth season, follows the events of “The Best of Both Worlds”, and gives the audience a rare and cherished glimpse of characters dealing with the consequences of previous events. Incidentally, this is the only episode in all of Star Trek canon that does not include a scene on the bridge. Enterprise follows this trend twice- once with the episode entitled “Two Days and Two Nights” in its first season, and another entitled “Home”, which features Enterprise crew members dealing with the personal issues following the conclusion of the Xindi conflict. While there are other episodes that mention or feature shore leave, these are those predicated around it. With that in mind, which shore leave episode is your favorite? Give us your vote, and let us know your reasons in the comments section below!
  18. The Kobayashi Maru Scenario is the most notorious test at Starfleet Academy. This test is the famous no-win scenario that tests the character of a Starfleet officer as much as it tests the technical skills of command. The scenario is famously impossible to beat. No matter what course of action you take the outcome is always the same. Only one Starfleet officer ever beat the Kobayashi Maru, and it’s only because he cheated. While the exact elements of the simulation have changed from era to era the basic setup remains the same. The version that we are most familiar with strands the civilian freighter Kobayashi Maru in the Klingon Neutral Zone after striking a mine. Once the cadet’s ship enters the Neutral Zone multiple Klingon battle cruisers converge on them and attack. It’s considered impossible to both survive the attack still intact and save the crew of the Kobayashi Maru. In a possible variant in the 24th century, a Ferengi transport and an ambush by Romulan warbirds are used in place of an attack by the Klingons. It is obvious that there is no “right” answer when it comes to facing the infamous scenario. That’s why it is considered unwinnable, and what makes it an excellent tool for teaching command-track cadets. How the cadet chooses to proceed is more important than finding a path to a complete victory. This week, we’d like to know what you think is the best answer to the no-win scenario, if there is one. While you might not be able to win, do you see a strategy that is superior to the others? What do you think is the best approach to the Kobayashi Maru scenario?
  19. Which Position Carries The Most Risk? Let’s face it- space travel is a risky business. Swimming through a void specifically designed to kill any organic life as we understand it is no mean feat, and that’s not even mentioning the various dangers that the political climate can bring to bear. If the vacuum doesn’t boil your character’s blood, the Romulan disruptors pointed at them will. If the hostile natives don’t run a spear through their body, the flesh-consuming bacteria they picked up will finish the job quick enough. No matter what position and department they fill on a ship or a station, there is always immense risk. But while some of that risk is universal, others are more specialized. A security officer is the first line of defense against enemy incursions. A doctor runs the greatest risk of infection by plagues, due to their exposure to them. Engineers constantly effect repairs in dangerous and less than ideal circumstances. Counselors deal with potentially violent or disturbed patients. This poll asks you which duty post/department carries the most risk overall. Give us your vote, and explain away in the comments section below!
  20. If you are looking for something to eat on a ship with replicators there is no shortage of options. Starfleet replicators have a massive library of recipes from across the Federation and beyond. It doesn’t matter what a Starfleet officer could want. Whether as simple as a piece of toast for breakfast or catering a dinner party for members of a dozen alien species, the replicator can provide. Simply push a button and ask for whatever dish is desired. And if on the off chance there is a food not already in the database the replicator pattern can be created and uploaded to the database. However, everyone has their own preferences for food. Everyone has foods that they prefer not to eat if they can at all avoid it. It is unlikely that many people could go through the entire replicator database and not find some foods that they would dislike. This week’s poll asks you what dishes would not be found on your character’s table. What types of food can your character not stand? Be sure to cast your vote!
  21. In the distant past, Romulans and Vulcans were one. Romulans did not exist for centuries of Vulcan history. Only during the Age of Surak did the Romulans begin as their own people. They refused to adopt Surak’s philosophies about logic and emotion. These Vulcans who “marched beneath the raptor’s wings” left the planet on a long odyssey. Eventually, these wayward Vulcans would find their way to Romulus and form the Romulan Star Empire. For the longest time Vulcan and Romulus remained separate. They went on divergent paths of history and developed their own unique cultures. The Vulcans joined the Federation and continued to follow the logical path of Surak’s teachings. Meanwhile, the Romulans became an expansionist military power built on extreme paranoia and mistrust. Despite their common roots the two civilizations didn’t seem to have much in common. This hasn’t kept people on both sides from desiring a unification between the Vulcans and Romulans. What form would this reunification take? For most Vulcans, the idea was to have peaceful diplomatic discussions with the Romulans. The Romulan Star Empire saw the goal of reunification as the conquest of Vulcan. Reunification remains a dream for many Romulans and Vulcans despite the barriers to unification. What do you think about the prospects of a reunion for the two powers? Could Vulcan-Romulan Reunification work? Let us know your thoughts and cast your vote!
  22. Emblems, flags and symbols are ubiquitous in the universe of “Star Trek”. Civilizations across the galaxy, be they powerful empires or miniscule entities, are easily identified by their particular sigil of identity. These designs are generally eye-catching, descriptive and easily discerned from one another. The Federation’s has undergone several changes over the shows and movies, but all have maintained the peaceful colors, olive branches and starfield that exude an air of serenity and cooperation. The brazen, barren trefoil design of the Klingon Empire strikes perhaps the opposite note, effectively displaying their imperial approach and aggressive stance to their allies and enemies alike. The Romulans employ a wide-winged raptor, announcing their commitment to their roots and a desire to dominate. The list goes on and on, and for the eagle-eyed viewer, it can provide a seemingly endless source of interest and world-building potential. This week’s poll asks you to tell us what your favorite civilization emblem is. Consider aesthetics, effectiveness and uniqueness in your answer, and let us know what you think in the comments section below!
  23. No matter what ship you write on, what position your character fulfills, or what department they’re attached to, he, she or ner has an important role in the smooth operation of the vessel. We’d not get far without helmsmen or engineers, exploration would be a drag without our scientists and specialists, and the crew would certainly falter without the skills of the medical and counseling staff. The shared usefulness of these departments, however, marks where their similarities end. Each has a different expectation, a different goal, and different challenges when it comes to simming for them. Finding a way to engage an engineer in the plot without having something break can often be something of a struggle. Coming up with a way to keep a counselor relevant in a given story is another often-cited problem. A medical officer needs some degree of understanding when it comes to the art of healing- not exactly an easy prospect when a writer’s only aid is a knowledge of biology, and a few loose threads shown in canon. The same might be said for a science officer. The rest have their own obstacles. With these limitations in mind (and others that you’ve encountered in simming for a duty post) which department is the most difficult to sim for? Give us your vote, and let us know your reasons in the comments section below!
  24. In Star Trek, the characters often reference art from their respective cultures. This could be as simple as a passing reference to a novel or something as complex as playing out scenes from a play on the holodeck. Data was a fan of Sherlock Holmes. Worf was known for being well-versed in all things related to Klingon culture. Multiple members of the Enterprise-D senior staff played parts in classic plays from Earth during their down time. Star Trek is full of references to classical music, Shakespeare, and literature. However, one aspect of culture seen much less frequently is the modern-day literature, art, and music of the Federation. Whether it be Worf’s Klingon opera or Data and Picard playing out a scene from Henry V, most of the culture from the Federation that we see is historical and not current. With art from Earth it makes sense for producers to reference well-known classics like Shakespeare. But even when dealing with alien art we always seem to see art from that world’s distant past. While a few episodes do give us glimpses into the bestselling holonovels and popular culture of the 24th century, it seems that most people are content to stick with the classics from centuries ago. What do you think about the lack of modern culture in the Star Trek universe? Is it just a trick to limit production costs or a major missed opportunity for worldbuilding? Cast your vote and let us know what you think!
  25. Many cadets enter Starfleet Academy with high hopes, boundless aspirations, and plan to excel in their field wherever possible. The vast majority proceed to do just that. But very few seem to give consideration to what happens after their time in Starfleet, after their career has reached its peak. It’s well into the 25th century (or even the 26th). Your character is a captain, or perhaps even an admiral, and for whatever reason, they have decided to finally retire from the active fleet. They are still in relatively good health, and despite technological advancements and the usual political and social machinations that have always presented threats the the United Federation of Planets, our great civilization has enjoyed an unprecedented period of relative peace and calm. Without the weight of those pips, they are free- free to do what they will in a galaxy seething with opportunity. This week's poll asks how your character would spend that time? Would they focus on family, settling down to be among loved ones in waning years? Would they explore on their own, seeing parts of the galaxy they hadn’t been to during their tenure in the fleet? Maybe they’d consult for Starfleet, or teach at the Academy. Or perhaps they’d enter the private sector- leaving Starfleet might not be the end. Give us your vote, and explain away in the comments section!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.