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Found 262 results

  1. It's difficult to think about Star Trek and not have the theme music of a favoured series pop into the head. From the first time the Original Series popped onto television screens, the soundtrack composed by Alexander Courage has ensured Star Trek remained firmly in hearts and minds for years to come. Several composers have attempted their own version of this since, emulating and expanding upon one of the most iconic and well-loved pieces of orchestral composition. As with music tastes throughout the ages, the spin-offs of Star Trek have each introduced their fresh take on a theme. Over the years, we've seen some of these enter the hallowed halls of classical music and venerated with the same respect as movie themes known and loved the world over, while others have become pop sensations. Now, we move into a new era of Star Trek with Discovery and Picard, and a new generation of composers bring their interpretation and ideas. This week, we want to know which of these themes strummed your heartstrings and plucked your imagination chords. Do you rock along to the dulcet tones of Russell Watson, the bongo drums of the Original Series or feel the stirring inspiration from Deep Space Nine? Which of these soundtracks is your hallowed favourite?
  2. When you mention ships of the Trekverse, the one everyone remembers is the Enterprise; the beautiful vessel that has captured the hearts and imaginations of the audience and the crew through years of successive storytelling. In the series, where space flight could be perilous, encounters with enemies more so, and hosting everyday life on board, the ships of the line became as recognisable in the shows as the characters themselves. You'd be hard-pressed to find a Star Trek fan who can't identify the sleek lines of the Galaxy class on sight, or punch the air when the Sovereign class makes that famed strafing run against the Borg. However, there are the unsung heroes of the Starfleet ship catalogue in the smaller ships; those with a smaller crew, designed for a specific purpose, and perform their role within the universe perfectly. This broad range of starships includes vessels designed for war the Federation didn't plan for, scientific vessels with limited weapons capabilities, ships solely for transport and supply, or for scouting in areas larger ships would be detected. In a universe where space vessels make up the primary settings for our characters, encounters, and stories, having a ship which suits the tale you want to tell is paramount. So, this week, we want to know if any of these ships have captured your interest and your imagination. Have you had dreams of sailing around the galaxy doing all the science in your Oberth class, opted for the cloak and dagger aspects of a Saber class, or would you be interested in running search and rescue missions in a Defiant? Which of these smaller ship classes has ever piqued your interest?
  3. A student’s stay at Starfleet Academy can be a lengthy one, spanning four years of intensive training and education, combining multiple disciplines and academic achievements of phenomenal proportions. Many of those who graduate in their fields are the top the academy has to offer, including some with double majors, some cramming in as much study as they can into the brief season until they're flung off into the wide-open wilds of space. However, outside that realm of high academic achievement and success, like any other college and university, Starfleet Academy provides the students with the opportunity to take part in multiple extracurricular activities. Activities are structured around exercise, learning new skills, socialising with other cadets, becoming self-disciplined, and taking a break from the rigours of their chosen career. With that in mind, our question for this Poll of the Week is: What extracurricular activities at Starfleet Academy did your character find love or loathing for?
  4. It’s been a staple of the Original Series for its entire run. Visited three times over the seasons, the Galactic Barrier stands as one of the more esoteric and dangerous threats the crew of the Starship Enterprise ever faced. Other vessels had and have attempted to penetrate the enormous purple energy field, usually at great- or absolute- cost. One thing is certain; though dangerous, the secrets it holds are probably vast. Starfleet’s mission, one of discovery and protection, would make the Galactic Barrier a tempting target for starship crews across the quadrants. Under what circumstances would you cross or enter the Galactic Barrier?
  5. Bouncing off from the poll a few weeks ago regarding "Modern Conveniences" and all that future technology we couldn't live without (check it out here if you missed it!), we're exploring the wonder of the Holodeck. From fascinating sojourns through space and time, to imaginative crew creating their own holodeck adventures, to becoming trapped in a nightmare of someone else's creation, we've seen Star Trek explore the very essence of what it is to have such an ingenious technology on board a starship or station. Indulging in fantasies, recreating training environments only available on starships, escaping the day-to-day monotony of serving in deep space. We saw a seemingly never-ending string of holodeck activities that became quintessential parts of the characters we grew to love in the 24th century. From Geordi's recreation of Leah Brahms and falling in love with his conceptualised vision of her, Worf's intense and ferocious training programs to take part in his Klingon lifestyle, a rivalry conducted in a baseball game by the crew of Deep Space Nine, Voyager's Doctor envisioning a real life for himself he could not have as a non-corporeal being, Data's poker game against the greatest minds in Earth's history, tom and Harry's Bride of Chaotica comic-style program, and the unforgettable adventures of the San Francisco Detective story of Captain's Picard's Dixon Hill. Over time, and use, the technology has become a staple of the Star Trek diet and as part of the fundamentals of Trek as a tricorder. However, not all is as riveting and wonderful in the world of holodecks. Crews have also explored the pitfalls and tribulations of when this technology goes wrong, or suffered from holodiction, excluding real-world responsibilities while the subject immerses themselves in this fantasy life. Reginald Barclay showed us the dangers of this when he recreated likenesses of his colleagues in the holodeck; deliberately crafting scenarios where he could be the hero over his superior male officers while becoming intimate with female staff. In the same vein, on Deep Space Nine, we saw the grittier side as Quark made his holosuites available to cater to the sexual proclivities of patrons attending Quark's Bar. And if you're looking for the worst offender, Data's Sherlock Holmes program featuring a Moriarty who wants to leave the holodeck is arguably one of the best Star Trek episodes to use the concept of the technology to the full advantage. This week, we want to know which episodes of the holodeck were the worst offenders, or do they hold a special place in that strange heart of yours? Is a bad holodeck adventure better than the good ones? Which of these holodeck episodes gets the trekkie thumbs down?
  6. Recently, the last episode of Picard’s first season was aired, or… added? Anyway, it’s been out for awhile now. Before the first episode was released, we ran a poll asking you what you were looking for in the new show. Most of y’all wanted a juicy story to get involved in. There is plenty of debate regarding whether the show delivered that, but as with any new piece of media, in depth consideration will take some time. We may ask for more thoughtful consideration in the future, but for right now, what did you think of the first season of Picard? Did it satisfy? Did it disappoint? Did it not interest you? Have you not watched it? What did you think of Picard? Let us know in the comments below! And please remember- no spoilers!
  7. Future technology is nothing if not incredibly convenient. Technology helps make the life of Starfleet officers easier and more enjoyable every day. Turbolifts can take someone almost anywhere on a ship in a minute or two. Replicators can create almost anything imaginable. Holodecks can take you anywhere from a historic battle to a peaceful park for a walk. The cultural and scientific knowledge of hundreds of worlds is compiled within Memory Alpha. Keeping in touch with friends and family is no issue with transporters able to take you halfway across the world in a second, real-time subspace video calls, and easy and convenient travel through the Federation. Of the modern luxuries in the 24th century, everyone has those that they use most frequently. But there are others that could easily go unused. Turbolifts may be faster, but the jefferies tubes can get to just as many places. Some people swear off ever using replicators and only eat real food. Others might never call home over subspace and just rely on letters back and forth to keep in touch with people back home. A few officers in Starfleet history were terrified of transporters and would use shuttles whenever possible. This week, we want to know which technological convenience your character would be least willing to go without. Would your character be completely lost without a food replicator? Is being able to talk face-to-face with family the only thing that makes life out on a starship bearable? Which 24th century comfort would your character be least willing to give up?
  8. On this, our glorious day of April 1st, where the pranks are many and the fools roam free... we remember that the Federation has moved on from a calendar based on the movement of the Earth and now April does not exist in our future timeline. However! Fear not, brave prankster, as there is still many jokes to be had within our futuristic realm. Practical jokes on fellow officers is a tradition older than Starfleet itself, with arms stretching back throughout the history of Earth with the Feast of Fools in France, Royal Court Jesters being an actual vocation for some, and the Lord of Misrule in England's Christmastide. While our post-scarcity utopia strives for peace in all things, we can still let out the jovial jester from time to time, and we've seen many a prank cross our TV screens throughout the series. Would your character prank another? Are they known as the ship jester? Do they revel in mischief and delight in disorder?
  9. You've heard of James Bond, the suave, capable, utterly fearless mysogonist that never fails to get the girl- or get into trouble. Our cultural understanding of a secret agent is often informed by his actions and character. But, naturally, there's so much more potential for a worthy character to follow in his footsteps. Kirk, Picard, Sisko, Janeway and Archer each had noticable, seperate and distinct personalities, and each- generally speaking- managed to get the job done. The question then, is this- which of the captains do you think would make the best secret agent? Whatever you chose, know that there's at least one thing the captains and Bond have in common- Q is never far away.
  10. In the 24th century, older forms of entertainment like television and radio seem to be obsolete and no longer in use. Entertainment like holonovels and live performances by the crew have become more prominent. Additionally, the Starfleet database contains music from across the galaxy going back centuries. There doesn’t really seem to be much need for the radio anymore. However, it’s hard to believe that music just stopped being made. There have to be aspiring musicians out there creating new music. Commentators from Bajor to Vulcan no doubt would like to share their opinions on current events in the Federation. Radio stations today often struggle with falling audience numbers and the resultant drop in advertisement revenue. In a post-scarcity economy, radio stations could make a comeback and serve a niche audience. What kind of music would your character listen to after a long day to unwind? Would they choose the greatest hits of the 20th century or is the indie music of the 23rd more to their liking? Maybe your character would prefer to listen to talk radio shows and keep up to date with current events. With commercial viability being a lower barrier for entry, even radio dramas could make a resurgence. If Starfleet had radio stations on the ship, what would your character listen to?
  11. Food. Where would we be without it? From croissants to cakes and burgers to belini, food comes in all shapes and sizes, flavours, colours and a beautiful crescendo of all things wonderful. Food in Trek is a whole different ballgame, introducing alien cuisine and replicator technologies. creating a veritable smorgasbord of combinations. Fancy a bit of Klingon and Vulcan fusion? Bajoran and Ferengi? There's something for everyone in the ever evolving world of food in the 24th century. Is your character a chef with the culinary flair of Neelix? Or the traditional human-style cook of Sisko's Creole Kitchen? Do they long for a kitchen of their own to sling pots and pans around in, or happy enough to set the replicator to launch mode and catch popcorn in their mouth? Presented with a buffet of all things bountiful, would you be willing to try any of these foods from around the galactic atlas? Give us your vote and let us know your thoughts in the comments section!
  12. The possibilities that come with Star Trek are virtually endless; the setting, spirit and lore make for countless avenues of exploration. One of these is the fantastic technologies permitted. A sufficiently… shall we say unconventional mind is capable of imagining all sorts of new and weird potential uses for the technology. Sure, you could take the conventional route when it comes to major bodily changes for your health or appearance, but why bother when you could do something inadvisable and ridiculous? With that in mind, would you be willing to use the transporter to purposefully change parts of yourself? Give us your vote and let us know your thoughts in the comments section!
  13. The computer on a Starfleet ship is an excellent resource. The database contains star charts, logs of everything that the ship has encountered, and a reference library including literature from hundreds of worlds, historical data spanning thousands of years, and information from dozens of fields of study from astrophysics to microbiology. In addition to the raw storage capacity, the ship’s computer can assist in analyzing data and simulate just about anything given enough data. While collaborating with the ship’s computer is very helpful, some people do not like talking to a disembodied computer voice. Many Starfleet officers have turned to the holodeck so that the computer has an avatar to communicate through. When Voyager’s EMH needed to learn exobiology, he created a consultant program modeled on an infamous Cardassian doctor. Data consulted with a holographic recreation of Sigmund Freud to help interpret his dreams and Barclay called on the expertise of hologram Einstein to discuss physics and cosmology. Even holoprograms like Vic Fontaine and Leonardo da Vinci would sometimes give advice to the crew in times of need. Everyone needs advice now and then. When confronted with a problem, why not get the perspective of someone who has been there before? The famous captains of Starfleet have seen it all in their various missions across the galaxy. Their service records, appearances, and personality profiles would all be easily accessible to the computer. What would Captain Kirk make of the Borg? What better way to work through a complicated conundrum than sitting down and enjoying a cup of Earl Grey with a holographic Picard? Which Starfleet captain would your character most want to receive advice from?
  14. Star Trek has rumbled through galactic intrigue, space invasion, species annihilation, and still made time for friendships and romance on the side. While most made it into the history books as some of the best examples of bromance and non-traditional friendships (Geordie and Data, anyone?), some of those intergalactic pairings never showed up again on our screens, leaving fans to wonder "what if" for their favourite ships through the years. Over six decades of Trek, times and attitudes have definitely changed for the better and the tradition of showing these interspecies relations has continued into Discovery and the brand new Picard. It's one element of storytelling the writers got right. As this month marks Valentine's Day, we're exploring the best romances Trek has to offer. Barriers between gender, species, religion and race have come down and we're on the cutting edge of showing love is love. With that in mind, this brings us swinging into our Poll of the Week. Be aware; they may divide opinions! Which romantic pairing did you root for in Star Trek?
  15. Star Trek has varied in tone and style over the years. An individual series can be more hopeful and with a retro science fiction style, or more dark and morally complex. It could even be live-action or animated. But in general, each main Star Trek series is of the same basic genre. What if the franchise decided to branch out in a big way for a new spinoff? The launch of the new Picard series and the various projects related to Discovery have left plenty of options for spinoffs. Most of these proposed spinoff projects would be focused on particular characters. However, the Star Trek universe is full of characters, technologies, and alien worlds to explore. There could be room to explore that universe through a series that is in a slightly different genre from a traditional Trek series. A police procedural or a medical drama set in the Star Trek universe would have a lot of options and more than fifty years of reference material to draw on. These other television genres might be unusual for the Star Trek universe, but they could certainly be an interesting look into various corners of the Trek universe. Which television genre would make for an interesting Star Trek spinoff series?
  16. About two years ago, I had the distinct pleasure to play a game with a number of my friends from the fleet. Though I’d played the game for a number of years, it was the first time I’d actually done it as a group. I had so much fun that it still rings in my mind today, and I long to try it again. The game, as you might have guessed from my oh-so-witty title, was Star Trek Online, a free-to-play MMORG set in a truly chaotic version of our beloved fictional universe. One of the most space combat simulators I’ve come across, STO permits people from around the world to easily find each other, and enjoy some battle together. Some of you may have seen the hilarity that ensues when a number of our group participate in a round or two of Bridge Crew, and I’d like to see how viable that idea is in regards to STO. We have a fleet, but because there’s been little success in getting a solid presence in game, it hasn’t made much progress. So! With that in mind, this week’s Poll asks you for your opinion on Star Trek Online! Have you played it and enjoyed it? Never heard of it? Not a fan? Give us your thoughts in the poll here, and don’t forget to leave a comment!
  17. The Star Trek universe is home to all kinds of sentient life. The various humanoids that populate the galaxy are only the beginning. There are also the members of the enigmatic Q Continuum, giant crystalline beings, spaceborne animals, energy spirits, and a living nebula or two. But what about the androids, holoprograms, and computers of the galaxy? Advances in the field of artificial intelligence produce artificial intelligences that are more and more lifelike and capable of things that would never be expected from the computers of previous generations. Even technology not typically treated as actual beings, such as the Enterprise D computer, have demonstrated the ability to develop a mind of their own with repeated use. The status of artificial beings such as Lieutenant Commander Data or Voyager’s EMH have been the central conflict in multiple episodes. While Data and the other Soong androids are a unique case, there was nothing particularly exceptional about the EMH on Voyager until prolonged activation and accumulated experiences as the ship’s doctor caused him to expand beyond his original programming. If the Doctor could become a sentient being, is every hologram capable of the same transformation? Holoprograms such as the Doctor or Vic Fontaine appear to be the exception rather than the rule. What would the effects on life in the Federation change if every holoprogram and computer had the same rights as any other sentient being? How is sentience in an artificial being determined, if it is possible at all? That is the question we’d like to pose to you this week. Do you think androids, holograms, and computers should be considered sentient beings?
  18. Possibly the most anticipated TV series of all time (at least, for us) is due to hit screens worldwide on Friday the 24th January. Reportedly faces have already melted, minds were blown, and there are good things expected all around. What we know already is in the Spoiler Channel it looks interesting. With this in mind, we're looking at getting everyone's thoughts on what you're looking forward to in watching the new series, and anything we might have missed from the list above. We're all very excited to see the continuation of the Picard saga, and more than happy to see Number One is his French Pitbull. What aspect of Picard are you most (or not!) looking forward to? Sling in your vote and don't forget to leave a comment!
  19. Prequels are a sensitive subject in many television and literary communities. While some believe them to be generally interesting, positive ideas, the sudden abundance of stories-before-stories has others taking a more cynical viewpoint. Whatever your stance on this issue, it’s difficult to deny that the Star Trek captains we know and love have had very interesting histories, oftentimes touched on in their respective shows in interesting ways. Kirk’s days at the Academy and his time on the Farragut and Republic had profound effects on his decisions and character years later. Picard’s early command of the Valiant and his background in archaeology have been touched on in novels, and might yield an interesting dive into how he became the man known more commonly to fans. Archer’s time as a test pilot during the race to Warp 5, and the resulting tensions and issues with the Vulcan people, might well be a fascinating examination of how Earth grew and changed from war-ravaged hell to peaceful utopia. This week’s poll asks which captain you’d most like to see a prequel series focus on. Give us your vote here, and don’t forget to leave a comment!
  20. The transporter has always raised interesting questions in the fields of science and philosophy. The inner workings and technical limitations of the transporter have been thoroughly explored in numerous episodes before. And between degrading patterns, faulty equipment, and the horrific results of attempted transporting gone wrong, it’s hard to blame someone like Lieutenant Barclay from being afraid of using the transporter. However, one bizarre type of transporter accident, duplication such as that experienced by William T. Riker, is a great example of how transporters can change our perception of personal identity. Transporter twins put this issue front and center by sparing the officer on the transporter pad from dematerialization, but still materialize them on the surface. This week, we present to you a similar hypothetical scenario with a twist. You are the captain of a Starfleet ship, patrolling through a relatively calm sector. Your ship receives a faint distress signal from a research facility on a nearby planet. An explosion of some kind has disabled their systems and injured several staff members. When you arrive, an atmospheric anomaly is interfering with communications. Your first officer, Commander Jones, volunteers to lead an away team down to the surface to provide assistance to the injured scientists. Most of the transporter beams reach the surface, but the transporter chief is worried Commander Jones’ signal didn’t make it and is able to cancel dematerialization at the final moment. Relieved to have narrowly escaped death, Commander Jones returns to the bridge and waits for contact to be re-established with the away team. The away team manages to get a message through the interference reporting that the situation is under control and they will begin beaming up survivors. Everything seems to be fine until the away team rematerializes in Transporter Room One with Commander Jones. However, Commander Jones is sitting right next to you on the bridge. It would seem that the transporter chief was mistaken in thinking that the transporter signal wouldn’t make it to the surface intact. When the second Commander Jones returns to the bridge, both commanders realize what has happened and claim themselves to be the “real” Commander Jones in unison. According to the Commander Jones who stayed aboard the ship, cancelling dematerialization was the proper thing to do and that the effects it would have on his duplicate are unknown. He believes that he should remain the executive officer. His transporter clone counters that the transport was successful and that the other Commander Jones only exists because of the transporter chief’s error. He is entitled to the position of first officer and the commander who remained on the ship is the “copy”. Both officers look to you to settle this case of duplicate identity. How would you handle the dispute between Commander Jones and his transporter duplicate?
  21. The Borg Collective has been one of Starfleet’s most dangerous enemies. A single Borg cube destroyed 39 Starfleet ships and was very close to assimilating Earth. In a later encounter, the crew of the Enterprise D had an opportunity to infect the Collective with a logic virus but did not carry out the plan. Some in Starfleet held this against Picard, but did he make the right decision? Ever since, any sighting of the Borg has been met with a response of overwhelming force from Starfleet. So much as a transwarp conduit opening is enough to provoke every ship in range to assemble. This week we put you in charge of Starfleet’s strategic planning when it comes to the Borg. Is the automatic assumption of hostility and throwing ships at the problem the best approach? The Borg Collective is different from most of the other enemies that have faced the Federation over the years. Are the Borg beyond diplomacy or change? It’s previously been shown that the Borg will make and break alliances as soon as they’re no longer getting what they want. But movements like Unimatrix Zero prove that the Borg can change. Does the involuntary nature of Borg drones change anything when it comes to destroying Borg ships and killing drones? Dealing with the Collective also brings up questions about the Prime Directive and whether they should be treated like any other alien power. What would be your strategy to defend against the Borg?
  22. Across the world, humans recently took various and generally well-meant oaths to improve themselves in some way or another. These resolutions follow an ancient tradition generally attributed to the Babylonian civilization of some four thousand years ago. Since then, countless resolutions have been started, to varying levels of success. Most alien characters in Star Trek follow their people’s teachings, faith and customs to some extent, but given the nondenominational nature of this particular tradition, it doesn’t seem too much of a stretch to think that individuals of any race might find it somewhat appealing. Does your character have a new year’s resolution? Give us your response below, and don’t forget to leave a comment!
  23. Whatever the occasion, gift-giving can be a difficult endeavor. Gift-giving means anticipating what someone else might want or need and determining what would be appropriate for the circumstances. Finding a good gift for someone isn’t only something that happens with distant friends or relatives. Even with our closest friends and family there are those who we struggle to shop for. The Star Trek universe can add further complicating factors to this. There are some species, like Vulcans, who are more practically-minded and utilitarian. Finding a present for an artificial lifeform like Data has its own challenges. Some people are also just private people whose tastes might be difficult to discern. Lieutenant Reed wasn't exactly the most social of his crew, and Garak’s life is so full of lies and disguises nobody really knows what his true personality is. This week we’d like to know who you would struggle to find a good gift for the most. Which character would be the most difficult to shop for?
  24. While many people in the world who celebrate Christmas do so with an active spiritual or religious component, a good number do not. Some have their own traditions, or prefer to approach the holidays from a more familial and traditional standpoint. The only thing more ubiquitous than celebrations on December 25th is the variety of ways in which this is accomplished. This got me thinking; if humans can choose to observe how they observe Christmas, how would alien species feel about the whole affair? More specifically for our purposes, how would your character approach the holiday? Would they be interested in immersing themselves in the festivities? Perhaps they’d be interested in observing from a distance. Maybe they’re simply not interested in it, or prefer not to involve themselves for spiritual reasons. Would your character be interested in celebrating some aspect of Christmas? Give us your vote, and don’t forget to leave a comment!
  25. Congratulations! You’ve got Beta shift free today. Good thing too- there’s supposed to be a concert aboard. You’re not sure who will be playing, or what they’ll play, but you can hold your hopes high. If you entered the concert hall, and watched the performer(s) of the evening step onto the stage, who would you be most excited for? Would Data and his violin interest you? Perhaps Harry Kim and his clarinet would earn your applause? Maybe Spock and his famous Vulcan lyre would soothe the nerves of a challenging day? Could Uhura’s famous vocals do the job? What Starfleet officer’s concert would you most enjoy attending? Click here to submit your vote, and don’t forget to leave a comment!
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