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Randal Shayne

Captains Council member
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Everything posted by Randal Shayne

  1. There’s no shortage of starship classes within the fleet. It seems that almost every mission has the perfect vehicle to achieve it. Operations that necessitate tactical ability can look to the nimble firepower of the Defiant class. Long forays into the depths of uncharted space are ideal for the massive explorers of the Federation- the Galaxy and Odyssey classes. And, of course, once those tactical aims have been achieved, or those planets have been explored, science/medical ships are needed, and that niche is filled by the Olympic class medical cruiser, or the Nova class science surveyor.
  2. Faith has always been a delicate question, one that Star Trek often enjoys examining. It’s no secret that Gene Roddenberry, creator of the idea for Star Trek, found religions to be undesirable, and this fact reflected quite clearly in many of the episodes produced under his tenure. That said, there have been a variety of installments that discuss the topic of faith in a balanced matter. Deep Space 9’s Kira Nerys proudly proclaims a spiritual relationship, and there have been other characters, both in Starfleet and elsewhere, that live similarly. On a starship or starbase, teeming with hundre
  3. The United Federation of Planets, most people will agree, is a vision of utopia unparalleled in its progressive stances on the different denominations that compose it, and in its wealth of resources, knowledge and altruistic endeavors. In the two and half centuries since its founding, the Federation has included 150 member worlds and thousands of outlying colonies within its ranks. Likewise, it has also encountered a multitude of other species- specifically, other governments and cultures. The Klingon Empire, the Romulan Star Empire, the Cardassian Union, the Ferengi Alliance, the Breen Confed
  4. Kirk. Picard. Sisko. Janeway. Archer. These names are familiar to even the most casual observer, and synonymous with Starfleet as a whole. Whether they were there to witness (or have a hand in!) the birth of the Federation itself, or contributed to its success hundreds of years later, each officer has left an indelible and valuable mark on the captains of tomorrow. While the historical archives might praise these pioneers justly, it becomes apparent just how many differences existed in their personal styles of command. James Kirk, arguably the most famous captain in Federation history, wa
  5. The term “flag officer” stems from more primitive years of Earth’s warfighting period, when ships bearing a fleet’s highest ranking officer (ostensibly a commodore or higher) would indicate this fact by flying a certain pennant or ensign. Despite such methods being outdated by 400+ years, the term persists at least into the end of the 24th century, and instead has come to denote someone of great experience and wisdom within the higher echelons of Starfleet. That said, there’s a common theme running through much of canon Star Trek; despite their lofty positions and sizable achievements, ma
  6. I've been meaning to add this here for days. Awesome stuff, Anders!
  7. The nominations have been examined, the recipients have been decided upon, and the ceremony has ended! The 2018 SB118 Awards Show has been a beautiful success! Writers from all across the fleet have been recognized for their fantastic contributions to our magnificent group. There’s a glow of contentment as people offer hearty congratulations and update their wiki pages accordingly. And then, if you’re anything like me, it feels as if Christmas has past, and there can be a lull during this time. So! Because I’m not quite ready to let go of awards season, I thought I’d add a last, more unof
  8. Better late than never. Wow! Where do I begin? Well, I suppose I should start by offering my most hearty congratulations to every single person here. This fleet is incredible because all of you are incredible, and I'm so delighted to see so many fantastic members receive the recognition they deserve for excellence and creativity beyond the norm. I’d just like to say a few words in particular, now that I have the opportunity. @Jarred Thoran, you are simply amazing. I have never seen someone do so much, so quickly and so cheerfully. This has been a long time coming, and I am so t
  9. The Prime Directive, whatever your opinion on it, is a fascinating rule to consider, and has undoubtedly caused more disagreement and discussion than most anything else in the Trek Universe. There seem to be episodes that would support both sides of the argument. One that is often referred to is Enterprise's "Dear Doctor". In it, the crew stumbles on a world with two species, who seem to live with one another in some sort of harmony. The Valakians, the dominant species, is facing extinction due to a rapidly spreading mutation, whereas the Menk, the second species, remain unaffected. As time go
  10. Many, many thanks to @Jarred Thoran for this lovely Dapper Shayne portrait!
  11. No one can deny that the Klingons have come a long way from their original form. Back in the 1960s, the Klingons were used as an allegory for Communist Russia. The foes that Kirk, Spock, and the crew of the Enterprise faced were treacherous, violent dictators, unafraid of taking advantage of any opportunity, and content to live in a society nearly as oppressed as the ones they so ruthlessly conquered. Women were not considered equals- indeed, they were forbidden from a seat on the High Council, leading a Great House, or ascending to the Chancellorship, save for certain extenuating circumstance
  12. Personally, I've always wanted to see something on Temporal Investigations, but that might be a disaster, as most of my ideas turn out to be.
  13. Fighting is, unfortunately, something of a constant in the Star Trek universe, as as such, different cultures and races approach the matter with unique viewpoints. Many, such as the Romulans, use classic techniques of subterfuge, confusion and shadowplay. Others, like the Klingons, prefer more upfront combat. In each instance, the weapon generally matches the strategy. And in many cases, a phaser or disruptor just won’t do. Either for personal honor and glory, or for purely tactical reasons (energy dampening fields), many fighting forces across the galaxy utilize melee weapons to defend t
  14. It is this poll-posers opinion that one of the best episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation was Season 3’s “Deja Q”. I’m confident that I’m not entirely alone in this statement, as it has frequently been lauded for its humour, intriguing storyline, and light atmosphere (for the most part). A quick refresher of the episode’s plot is in order. Essentially, Q, everyone’s favorite trickster/ superior being/ troublesome irritant, flashes onto the bridge of the Enterprise- D amid a planetary crisis. Q explains that he has been banished to this most unholy of places, and has lost his powers-
  15. Star Trek paints a vivid, expansive picture of a better future. It’s expansive nature and astonishing history are part of what makes it so much fun to write within. Our characters all enjoy the rich tapestry that hundreds, if not thousands of writers, have woven painstakingly over every episode. There’s also the appeal of making one’s own contribution to the lore, in a small but important way. But what if, instead of simply a hobby or a fun diversion, the world of Star Trek could become a little more concrete? What if one day, out of the blue, you were offered an opportunity to at
  16. The style of the Next Generation Klingons is incontrovertable and undeniable.
  17. ((Many, many feels. Great stuff.)) ((Alien Complex, Navatria, Arndall)) Dairro: Commander, come on, they’re closing on us. Leave him ::Jarred rubbed his eyes, with added pressure and rose to his feet. Green flashes buzzed passed, cracking in the air as they flew passed him. Risking a look back, he could make clearly make out the creatures, four emerald green eyes glowing in the dim light. They let out a screech as Jarred reached for his phaser and fired a few shots towards them when he heard Dairro cry out.:: ::Looking to his side his saw his fr
  18. No one can deny that Starfleet’s mission is incredibly dangerous. While it might be fulfilling, exploring uncharted systems and defending the Federation against her countless enemies is a risky business any way you cut it. As a result, Starfleet personnel are trained in rigorous fashion, spending years mastering the skills necessary to hack it in the brutal expanse of deep space. The stress of this burden is considerable. On top of this, many career officers have families, and it was eventually accepted that prolonged separation from loved ones had a generally negative effect on moral and
  19. The pips our characters display on their collars represent more than simply a rank and a position. They’re the embodiment of the blood, sweat and tears spent in the pursuit of such a distinction. It’s no secret that Starfleet’s vigorous four year curriculum is a challenge only the most devoted rise to and pass beyond. Indeed, even gaining admission into Starfleet Academy is considered an honor unto itself. But while each cadet faces similar challenges from an academic, physical, and emotional standpoint, and despite the regimented rigidity found and expected on campus, each newly commissi
  20. Star Trek has a long history of trial episodes. From the memorable “Court Martial”, in which Kirk is accused of criminal negligence regarding the death of a member of his crew, to “Rules of Engagement”, in which Worf must defend his actions during a heated battle aboard the Defiant, every Star Trek series has had its own quality moments of courtroom television. While we have seen many different types of law, from the Federations’ process of jurisprudence (what we are most familiar with today) to the brutal, predetermined show trials of Cardassia, each of these cases utilize a lawyer, or t
  21. Books. You can’t escape them, and in this poll-poser’s opinion, that’s a fantastic state of affairs! That said, it can be surprising to realize just how prevalent books seem to be in the universe of Star Trek. Picard obviously took great pride and joy in his substantial collection of literature, and we have witnessed a variety of other characters reading classic novels, Shakespearean works, and other leisure texts. Fiction, in some form or fashion, is an indelible part of our lives, and the same goes for the characters we write for. This week’s poll asks you to share your character
  22. (( Arndall )) (( Kematta Foothills - 17 kilometers from the First City. )) (( Time Index: 13 Hours before Blackwell arrives )) ::First Lieutenant Janra Vross peered in the stygian gloom and made no attempt to hide her discomfort. Ever since her mother had punished her as a small girl for misbehaviour by locking her in a tiny cupboard in her bedroom, she had never enjoyed dark and enclosed spaces. Now memories of those traumatic times came flooding back to her as she looked down the scope of her disruptor rifle. She took several deep breaths and tried to focus on the matte
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