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Randal Shayne

Captains Council member
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Everything posted by Randal Shayne

  1. Hey, don't blame me! I didn't make the movies! 😂
  2. The best soundtracks in films are those that match and enhance the ambiance and themes presented on the screen. In this regard, Star Trek composers have had a particularly difficult job- how do you compress wonder, mystery, and beauty into small auditory snippets? Fortunately for us fans, it seems that each movie in the Star Trek franchise has been graced with a phenomenal musical accompaniment. Whether it’s the introspective, grand and powerful themes from the Motion Picture, or the pulsating, action-filled tunes from the nuTrek movies, there’s something for everyone. This week’s poll asks yo
  3. I'd forgotten about that one! Well remembered!
  4. Weddings. Whether you’re throwing rice at the bride and groom or beating them over the head with Ma’Stakas, they are generally happy occasions, and symbolize a sacred union between two people. From the first (aborted) marriage of Robert Tomlinson and Angela Martine aboard the Enterprise NCC 1701, to the long-awaited conjugation of Deanna Troi and William Riker, Star Trek has a long tradition of showing such ceremonies on the screen. Each has taken a different tone, different visual style and, of course, different participants. This poll asks you which of the many marriage ceremonies shown on s
  5. It’s rather surprising to realize just how many relationships in Star Trek are principally parent/child based. In most cases, these connections between beloved characters has yielded fantastic character building episodes, while often posing intriguing philosophical questions. Since the first episode to feature an example of this trend, TOS’ “Journey to Babel”, in which Spock must confront the burden of command and the needs of his family, a long standing tradition has been maintained. Whether the relationship exists for a short time (such as in the TNG episode “The Offspring”) or for the leng
  6. There are an enormous number of inter-series cameos in Star Trek, and more often than not, they’re delightful treats, designed to connect and further flesh out a universe so massive it might otherwise become tangled and unfollowable. Quark and William Riker have enjoyed a number of these appearances, but for this particular poll, we’ll be focusing on those moments where characters from the original Enterprise were featured. Dr. Leonard McCoy’s tour of the Enterprise D is the first of these shown in the pilot episode for TNG, later followed by Ambassador Spock and his attempts to reunite the Ro
  7. For all the work they do exploring and saving the Federation from endless threats, it seems our beloved crews don’t get anywhere near enough shore leave. Nevertheless, when it is shown, more often than not, the results is excellent television. With the first episode to fit this bill- aptly titled “Shore Leave”- a precedent was set, one that episodes following it would generally honor. “Shore Leave” itself is often lauded by fans as a fun romp, and a standout of TOS’ first season. “Captain’s Holiday” features uptight and work-addicted Jean-Luc Picard become embroiled in a time-bending adventure
  8. Which Position Carries The Most Risk? Let’s face it- space travel is a risky business. Swimming through a void specifically designed to kill any organic life as we understand it is no mean feat, and that’s not even mentioning the various dangers that the political climate can bring to bear. If the vacuum doesn’t boil your character’s blood, the Romulan disruptors pointed at them will. If the hostile natives don’t run a spear through their body, the flesh-consuming bacteria they picked up will finish the job quick enough. No matter what position and department they fill on a ship or a st
  9. Emblems, flags and symbols are ubiquitous in the universe of “Star Trek”. Civilizations across the galaxy, be they powerful empires or miniscule entities, are easily identified by their particular sigil of identity. These designs are generally eye-catching, descriptive and easily discerned from one another. The Federation’s has undergone several changes over the shows and movies, but all have maintained the peaceful colors, olive branches and starfield that exude an air of serenity and cooperation. The brazen, barren trefoil design of the Klingon Empire strikes perhaps the opposite note, effec
  10. No matter what ship you write on, what position your character fulfills, or what department they’re attached to, he, she or ner has an important role in the smooth operation of the vessel. We’d not get far without helmsmen or engineers, exploration would be a drag without our scientists and specialists, and the crew would certainly falter without the skills of the medical and counseling staff. The shared usefulness of these departments, however, marks where their similarities end. Each has a different expectation, a different goal, and different challenges when it comes to simming for them.
  11. Many cadets enter Starfleet Academy with high hopes, boundless aspirations, and plan to excel in their field wherever possible. The vast majority proceed to do just that. But very few seem to give consideration to what happens after their time in Starfleet, after their career has reached its peak. It’s well into the 25th century (or even the 26th). Your character is a captain, or perhaps even an admiral, and for whatever reason, they have decided to finally retire from the active fleet. They are still in relatively good health, and despite technological advancements and the usual politic
  12. This fleet has an incredibly diverse array of teams, collectives and activities. Most of these are not directly tied to simming, but allow our member’s creative inclinations to flourish, while enriching this wonderful group. The Wiki Team, Image Collective and Podcast Team are just a few of our more popular facets. Another, from the mind of Captain Roshanara Rahman, is the Federation News Service, or FNS. On our spinoff site, https://fednewsservice.com/, a team of writers help to bring the rest of the Federation to life through news stories that don’t necessarily include Starfleet matters. The
  13. Lt. JG Choi Ji-hu, you are hereby charged with the following egregious crime; that you did knowingly, and willfully, elicit prolonged and genuine laughter from this writer, on Tuesday, December 18th, 2395. Upon opening the email, the victim came across the best opening he had ever seen in a sim. HOW DO YOU PLEAD, @aphelion?!
  14. There’s something quintessentially beautiful about Federation starships. Their curves, symmetricality and proud bearing provide a sense of awe. With the exception of a few, special cases (looks furtively at the Yeager class) most of these vessels carry on a long lineage of amazing designs. With that said, Starfleet isn’t the only organization that knows how to sculpt a shapely ship. The Klingons, and their bold, imperious designs have struck fear into the hearts of enemies for centuries. Romulan warbirds dwarf their competition with sweeping wings and imposing, almost beak-like hulls. Even the
  15. Embracing others, despite cultural differences, is a key aspect of Star Trek’s message and enduring legacy. Though Gene Roddenberry was loathe to include any sort of strife, negativity or conflict in his scripts, there have nonetheless been some superior character relationships that blossom from early dislike. In the Original Series, Spock and McCoy quickly despised one another’s perspectives and mentality, but over time, despite (or because of) the many arguments between them, mutual admiration and respect starts to underpin their association. Julian Bashir and Miles O’Brien are good examples
  16. The worst has finally happened- the alternate future seen in The Next Generation episode “Parallels” has come to pass. The Federation is no more, the Borg are swarming the Alpha Quadrant, and the only thing holding them at bay is Riker’s uncontrollable beard. Amidst this madness, you are determined to survive at any cost. But you can’t do it alone! In this desperate hour, you need a security officer by your side that you can trust, someone who has served Starfleet faithfully. The list is long and varied, and you may use any canon security officer from any time period. With that in mind, who wo
  17. @Solkar Ah, man- the Vulcan sass is just wonderful! ((Main Sickbay, USS Eagle)) :: Solkar strode into Sickbay with a sense of purpose and what might be called enthusiasm. He looked around the area, taking note of the biobeds, the monitors, supplies, desks and his fellow medical staff. A blur of blue moved in his peripheral vision, and he found a small Andorian standing in front of him. His rank was Lieutenant Commander. Solkar knew this was Doctor Foster, his Chief Medical Officer and direct supervisor:: Foster: Hey, you must be the new kid. Solkar, right? ::Solkar didn’
  18. The name says it all. In an organization as diverse, multifaceted and accepting as Starfleet, there’s bound to be a variety of different reasons to make the commitment to the fleet. For some, it’s the mission itself. More noble goals than Starfleet’s are difficult to come by, and their pursuit contributes to the expansion, continuation and improvement of an astonishing interstellar civilization. Other characters might have joined out of a sense of familial obligation. The fleet has been around in some form or fashion for centuries, and a tradition of service exists in many families, sometimes
  19. Brell brings up a good point- the vulnerability of shuttles makes them an excellent storytelling element, but from an in-universe perspective, I'd hate to get inside one. They get a raw deal- not strong enough to survive any sort of firefight, not small enough to escape most notice, not fast enough to pursue or run, not powerful enough for anything, it seems, besides a quick jaunt to the planet and back- which will, more often then not, be made complicated by atmospheres that interfere with power systems or some such. All in all, they have their purposes, but they're extraordinarily fragile, a
  20. Starfleet officers are saddled with an immense amount of responsibility. It seems like each day is just another chance to be vaporized, tortured, spaced, sucked into a black hole, or anything else in the pantheon of untimely demises. And yet, the beloved organization of exploration and defense grows its ranks and carries on a legacy of honor and optimism- boldly going where no one has gone before. These risks are accepted by all aboard, but there seems to be one duty description more hazardous and unpredictable than any other- First Contact specialists. A variety of Star Trek episodes s
  21. You may have a point there. 😁 I'm not at all surprised Garak is in the lead.
  22. They can’t all be from Starfleet! Certainly, our beloved crews are the main focus of virtually every episode of Star Trek, in some form or another. However, while interpersonal relationships and conflict are featured, it is generally an outside force or character that sets the tone of the episode, and the events that occur. Star Trek has a bad, though not entirely unearned, reputation for “one-off” characters- created simply to hammer home a message or make an otherwise improbable story believable. And then there are the regulars- characters that show up from time to time and have, in many c
  23. I found this stunningly powerful- beautiful writing, @Kali Nicholotti!
  24. ((Corridors Outside Sickbay, USS Columbia)) ::It had been a very long time since she had last stood in this place, and it looked entirely new. Nothing was left of the battles fought, save for the memories (or lack thereof) and the log entries and damage reports from years prior. It hadn’t taken Kali long to uncover her link to the ship before it had been refit, and in a way she hoped that her history with her would open the doors to some memories somewhere.:: ::But here as she stood, just outside the doors where the dragon had apparently crashed through the bulkhead, sh
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